Exercise Therapy and Stretching

  • New
Characteristics of Stabilizer Muscles:  A Systematic Review

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Purpose:  To identify the main characteristics, based on available evidence, of stabilizer muscles to inform the development of a definition of stabilizer muscles.   The highest number of articles providing supporting evidence that a particular muscle characteristic plays a stabilizing role related to biomechanical characteristics (27 articles), followed by neurological characteristics (22 articles) and anatomical/physiological characteristics (4 articles). 

    Conclusion:  Based on a synthesis of supporting evidence from the literature, stabilizer muscles can be defined as muscles that contribute to joint stiffness by co-contraction and show an early onset of activation in response to perturbation via either a feed-forward or a feedback control mechanism. These results may guide researchers to investigate which muscles exhibit these characteristics to determine whether particular muscles have a stabilizer rather than a prime mover role during normal functioning.


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  • New
Strength and Power Profiling Athletes:  Selecting Tests and How to Use the information for Program Design

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Strength and power diagnosis can provide valuable insights into the different capacities of athletes.  The strength and power tests chosen should be reliable and valid and take into account the requirements of the sport and what is a meaningful change in performance.  The results of these tests need to be reported in a clear, meaningful, and timely manner for coaches if they are to have maximal impact on training programs.  The practitioner can use this evidence-based information in conjunction with the art of coaching to maximise training program effectiveness. 


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  • New
Exercise for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Biopsychosocial Approach

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) refers to ongoing pain felt in the bones, joints and tissues of the body that persists longer than 3 months. For these conditions, it is widely accepted that secondary pathologies or the consequences of persistent pain, including fear of movement, pain catastrophizing, anxiety and nervous system sensitization appear to be the main contributors to pain and disability.

    While exercise is a primary treatment modality for CMP, the intent is often to improve physical function with less attention to secondary pathologies. Exercise interventions for CMP which address secondary pathologies align with contemporary pain rehabilitation practices and have greater potential to improve patient outcomes above exercise alone.

    Biopsychosocial treatment which acknowledges and addresses the biological, psychological and social contributions to pain and disability is currently seen as the most efficacious approach to chronic pain. This clinical update discusses key aspects of a biopsychosocial approach concerning exercise prescription for CMP and considers both patient needs and clinician competencies.


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Does Exercise Increase or Decrease Pain?  Central Mechanisms underlying these Two Phenomena

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Exercise is an integral part of the rehabilitation of patients suffering a variety of chronic

    musculoskeletal conditions. Regular physical activity is recommended for the treatment of chronic pain and its effectiveness has been established in clinical trials for people with a variety of pain conditions. However, exercise can also increase pain making participation in rehabilitation challenging for the person with pain. This review explores and discusses current evidence on central mechanisms underlying exercised-induced pain and analgesia.


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A Comprehensive Yoga Program Improves Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Low Back Pain:  RCT

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Previously, outpatient Yoga programs for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) lasting several months have been found to reduce pain, analgesic requirement and disability, and improve spinal mobility. This study evaluated changes in pain, anxiety, depression and spinal mobility for chronic LBP patients on short-term, residential Yoga and physical exercise programs, including comprehensive yoga lifestyle modifications.


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Which Specific Modes of Exercise Training are most Effective for Treating Low Back Pain?

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Objective Examine the effectiveness of specific modes of exercise training in non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). 

    Summary/conclusion There is low quality evidence that Pilates, stabilisation/motor control, resistance training and aerobic exercise training are the most effective treatments, pending outcome of interest, for adults with NSCLBP. Exercise training may also be more effective than therapist hands-on treatment. 


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Exercise Interventions for Health: Time to Focus on Dimensions, Delivery and Dollars (* Fast Track)

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The importance of physical activity is proven.  Exercise has preventive and therapeutic health benefits. Yet the vast majority of people in the developed world choose to remain inactive. The prevalence of chronic diseases contributed to by physical inactivity is escalating so rapidly that their costs will exceed $1 trillion in the United States in the next decade!  More alarming, there are 250 000 deaths annually in the United States directly attributable to physical inactivity.  Despite these distressing data, most physicians and health providers miss many opportunities to prescribe exercise when treating chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.  Solutions for these issues will be discussed.

    *Fast track = fast track your learning with our short online courses

     

     

     


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The Anti-inflammatory Actions of Exercise Training

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Pages 1 - 6.

    The list of diseases with a known inflammatory etiology is growing. Cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, geriatric cachexia, and Alzheimer’s disease have all been shown to be linked to, or exacerbated by, aberrantly regulated inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that those who are physically active, or who become physically active, have a reduction in biomarkers associated with chronic inflammation.  With few exceptions, the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise appear to occur regardless of age or the presence of chronic diseases.

     


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Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance:  A Randomized Controlled Trial

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Background: While static stretch (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and oscillatory physiological mobilization techniques are documented to have positive effects on a range of motion, there are no reports on the effect of dynamic oscillatory stretching (DOS), a technique that combines these three techniques, on hamstring extensibility.

    Purpose: To determine whether DOS improves hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance to a greater degree than SS in asymptomatic young participants.

    Methods: Sixty participants (47 females, 13 males, mean age 22 ± 1 years, height 166 ± 6 centimeters, body mass 67.6 ± 9.7 kg) completed a passive straight leg (SLR) to establish hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance as perceived by participants using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (SS or DOS) or a placebo control (20 per group). Tests were repeated immediately following and one hour after each intervention.

    Results:  Immediately post-intervention, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring extensibility as measured by the SLR in both the SS and DOS groups, with the DOS group exhibiting a significantly greater increase than the SS group.  One hour post-intervention, hamstring extensibility in the DOS group remained elevated, while the SS group no longer differed from the control group. Furthermore, the stretch tolerance remained significantly elevated for the SS group, but there was no difference between the control and DOS groups.

    Conclusion: DOS was more effective than SS at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring extensibility, and DOS demonstrated an increased stretch tolerance one-hour post-intervention.


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  • Article
Supporting the Body's Recovery Process Following Injury, Surgery or Immobilisation

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Stiffness and restricted range of movement are the most common clinical presentations second to pain. This on-line course is ideal for all therapists who would like to help others to recover or improve their ease and range of movement.

    Are you familiar with the physiological events and psychological impact on body and mind following injury, immobilization or surgery and what is the best approach to support the body’s natural recovery process.


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Mechanotherapy: How Exercise Promotes Tissue Healing

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The purpose of this course is to answer a frequently asked question ‘‘How precisely does exercise promote tissue healing?’’ 

    This is a fundamental question for clinicians who prescribe exercise for tendinopathies, muscle tears, non-inflammatory arthropathies and even controlled loading after fractures. What happens at the tissue level to promote repair and remodelling of tendon, muscle, articular cartilage and bone? 

    The one-word answer is ‘‘mechanotransduction’’, but rather than finishing there and limiting this course to 95 words, the authors provide a short illustrated introduction to this remarkable, non-neural, physiological process.

     

     


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Motor Control for Spinal Muscle Dysfunction

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Therapeutic exercise for low back pain has traditionally focused on programmes for enhancing cardiovascular fitness, as well as trunk muscle strength and endurance. More recently, exercises which address changing motor control strategies in back pain patients, have been recommended. 

    This course describes the rationale for the proprioceptive antigravity training model, for the prevention and treatment of low back pain.

     


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Exercise and Function without Pain

R400.00

3 CEUs

    We all know that exercise is good for us. There’s scientific evidence that shows that people who exercise are generally healthier, fitter, live longer and are less likely to develop a number of disabling medical conditions. As therapists, we often use exercise to reduce patients’ acute and chronic back, neck, shoulder and knee symptoms.

    But what if your patients can’t exercise, function or correct their posture effectively because pain inhibits their movement? How often do your patients just want to give up on their rehabilitation because of this? And how frustrating is it for you not to be able to use your skills as a physiotherapist to the fullest extent possible?

    This article describes an innovative, practical, quick and easy approach that will give you effective tools to enable your patients to function and/or exercise without pain as well as increase your confidence to utilise exercise as part of patient management.

    It’s called Exercise and Function without Pain (EFWP) and it’s making a huge impact on physical rehabilitation across South Africa.




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The Best Stretching Exercise

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Loss of range of movement (ROM) is a common outcome following injuries. The problem is that traditional stretching methods are often ineffective in improving ROM, let alone reducing pain and disability in various conditions -particularly where multi structure impairment is present.

    SO, WHAT CAN YOU DO?

    Kinesiologist Aaron Mattes has developed a solution to deal with the problem.

    It’s called AIS and it’s a lot more than a stretching method.

    This course will show you how to use AIS and its three evidence-based pain relieving modalities. AIS will increase your patients’ tolerance to pain while stretching and so improve their ROM.

     


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To stretch or not to stretch?  Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Static Stretch (SS) does not appear to reduce injury risk and any effect on earlier return to sport is of marginal clinical significance.  In contrast, a graduated strength training programme appears to significantly reduce injury risk and significantly reduce the time to return to sport after injury.

    Therefore, the only area in which SS might seem to offer a specific advantage is in the area of increasing flexibility.  However, there remains a lack of evidence that gains are superior to those of a strength training programme. Even if strength training is eventually confirmed as being inferior to SS at increasing flexibility, the fact that strength training improves performance, pain, disability, injury and return to sport rates mean strength training must be a mainstay of athletic development and training, in contrast to SS.


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Movement and Physical Activity: Targets for Treatment

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The aim of this course authored by Prof Paul Hodges is to present current understanding of the interaction between movement and pain; as a cause or effect of pain, and in terms of the role of movement (physical activity and exercise) in recovery of pain and restoration of function.


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Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome - Part 1

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The purpose of this course is to introduce alternative treatment approach for piriformis syndrome using a hip muscle strengthening programme with movement re-education. Interventions for piriformis syndrome typically consist of stretching, dry needling and/or soft tissue massage to the piriformis muscle. However, this case study highlights an alternative view of the pathomechanics of piriformis syndrome and proposes an effective different treatment approach.


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Treatment of Piriformis Syndrome - Part 2

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The purpose of this course is to introduce alternative treatment approach for piriformis syndrome using a hip muscle strengthening programme with movement re-education. Interventions for piriformis syndrome typically consist of stretching, dry needling and/or soft tissue massage to the piriformis muscle. However, this case study highlights an alternative view of the pathomechanics of piriformis syndrome and proposes an effective different treatment approach.


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Physical Activity and Healthy Ageing

R400.00

3 CEUs

    Does physical activity have an impact on the quality of life of the elderly?

    What if the individual only takes up physical activity later in life?

    Previous studies have examined the effects of mid-life physical activity on healthy ageing, but not the effects of taking up activity later in life. This on-line course examines the association between physical activity and healthy ageing over 8 years of follow-up for a group of individuals aged at around 63 years at the start of the study.


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