Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 1 - Introduction

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature. 

    The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system. 

    The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

    The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

     


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Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 2 – Basic Principles for Exercises

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

    The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

    The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

    The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

     


    read more
Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 3 – Sample Exercises

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

    The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

    The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

    The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.


    read more
Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 4 – Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization Exercise Modifications for Sports Techniques

R400.00

3 CEUs

    The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

    The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

    The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

    The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

     


    read more

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