Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance: A Randomized Controlled Trial


Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Background: While static stretch (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and oscillatory physiological mobilization techniques are documented to have positive effects on a range of motion, there are no reports on the effect of dynamic oscillatory stretching (DOS), a technique that combines these three techniques, on hamstring extensibility.

Purpose: To determine whether DOS improves hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance to a greater degree than SS in asymptomatic young participants.

Methods: Sixty participants (47 females, 13 males, mean age 22 ± 1 years, height 166 ± 6 centimeters, body mass 67.6 ± 9.7 kg) completed a passive straight leg (SLR) to establish hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance as perceived by participants using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (SS or DOS) or a placebo control (20 per group). Tests were repeated immediately following and one hour after each intervention.

Results:  Immediately post-intervention, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring extensibility as measured by the SLR in both the SS and DOS groups, with the DOS group exhibiting a significantly greater increase than the SS group.  One hour post-intervention, hamstring extensibility in the DOS group remained elevated, while the SS group no longer differed from the control group. Furthermore, the stretch tolerance remained significantly elevated for the SS group, but there was no difference between the control and DOS groups.

Conclusion: DOS was more effective than SS at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring extensibility, and DOS demonstrated an increased stretch tolerance one-hour post-intervention.

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Starts: Thursday, January 1 1970 at 2:00 AM
Ends: Thursday, January 1 1970 at 2:00 AM