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NEW - Essential Ethical Considerations of COVID-19

NEW - Essential Ethical Considerations of COVID-19

Testimonials:

Thanks that was very good and informative.  Good value for my practice.  Roxanne Ashkar, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

It gives a clear understanding of COVID-19 testing guideline.  Good value for my practice.  Zanele Sishuba, Physiotherapist, Kroonstad

Good value for my practice.  Hema Ratanjee, Physiotherapist, Lenasia 

I really enjoyed reading the Covid-19 article as I can relate it with what is currently happening in SA and the entire world. Thank you for stimulating my mind through the test.  Excellent value for my practice.  Maropeng Rammupudu, Physiotherapist, Groblersdal 

Good value for my practice.  Anna Springett, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Essential topic and very informative!  Excellent value for my practice.  Danilla Colares Lino, Physiotherapist, Centurion 

Excellent value for my practice.  Kerishni Padayachee, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 


This on-line course provides frequently asked questions regarding ethical considerations of COVID-19 pandemic for Healthcare Providers.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

0.00

NEW - A Comprehensive Yoga Program Improves Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Low Back Pain:  RCT

NEW - A Comprehensive Yoga Program Improves Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Low Back Pain: RCT

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

 

Previously, outpatient Yoga programs for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) lasting several months have been found to reduce pain, analgesic requirement and disability, and improve spinal mobility. This study evaluated changes in pain, anxiety, depression and spinal mobility for chronic LBP patients on short-term, residential Yoga and physical exercise programs, including comprehensive yoga lifestyle modifications.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section I - Pain Principles

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section I - Pain Principles

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ndamulelo Nemakonde, Physiotherapist, Thohoyandou 

Thank you very simplistic guidance for patients to understand pain pathways.  Excellent value for my practice.  Simone Burgesmeir, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Diane Godfrey, Physiotherapist, Howick

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


This section discusses the mechanisms of pain.  Without being too technical and whilst not relevant to every patient, it gives good insight into nociception, the processing of nociception and the production of pain.  Issues such as the modulation of pain, both habituation (turning down) and sensitization (amplification) are discussed.  A basic and brief section for any patient who might want to further details about pain mechanisms is provided.  Each page can be printed separately and used as an infographic. 


3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section II - Key Concepts

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section II - Key Concepts

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Kerrie Austin, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


The backbone of this workbook might be the most important section.  Key messages are ideally delivered at the right time to the right person.  They help patients reconceptualize pain, change their beliefs about pain and facilitate healthy behaviours to help with pain.  This section could be printed in its entirety, or any individual page could be printed on each patient visit and viewed as a standalone infographic.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Pain Guidebook:  Section III a - Pain Contributors

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section III a - Pain Contributors

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


Pain is multidimensional and influenced by a number of factors besides tissue damage.  This section overlaps with the Key Messages and starts to give the reader more information about potential contributors to pain.  You can also view it a little like a myth debunker.  We have information on posture, strength, movement habits, sitting, mechanical deformities, depression, fear and exercise.  Again, each page can be used as an infographic. 

You can print parts of this section or have your patient read the whole thing. 

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Pain Guidebook:  Section III b - Pain Contributors

NEW - Pain Guidebook: Section III b - Pain Contributors

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Netsie Hamilton-Attwell, Physiotherapist, Darling 

Excellent value for my practice.  Simone Burgesmeir, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


Pain is multidimensional and influenced by a number of factors besides tissue damage.  This section overlaps with the Key Messages and starts to give the reader more information about potential contributors to pain.  You can also view it a little like a myth debunker.  We have information on posture, strength, movement habits, sitting, mechanical deformities, depression, fear and exercise.  Again, each page can be used as an infographic.  

You can print parts of this section or have your patient read the whole thing. 



3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Beyond the Joint:  The Role of Central Nervous System Reorganizations in Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders

NEW - Beyond the Joint: The Role of Central Nervous System Reorganizations in Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders

In this on-line teaching aide, the authors argue that to improve rehabilitation out­comes in patients with chronic musculo­skeletal pain, a global view of the disorder, which incorporates both central (neural) and peripheral (joint-level) changes, is needed. The authors also discuss the challenge of evaluating and rehabilitating central changes.

3

CEUs

NEW - Advances in Neuroscience Imply that Harmful Experiments in Dogs are Unethical

NEW - Advances in Neuroscience Imply that Harmful Experiments in Dogs are Unethical

Functional MRI of fully awake and unrestrained dog ’volunteers’ has been proven an effective tool in understanding the neural circuitry and functioning of the canine brain.  Studies show that there exists a striking similarity between dogs and humans in the functioning of the caudate nucleus (associated with pleasure and emotion), and dogs experience positive emotions, empathic-like responses and demonstrate human bonding which, some scientists claim, may be at least comparable with human children.  This article therefore contends that using dogs in invasive and/or harmful research, and toxicity testing, cannot be ethically justifiable.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

Five Keys to a Great Small Business Marketing Strategy

Five Keys to a Great Small Business Marketing Strategy

Testimonials: 

Excellent value for my practice.  Nelisiwe Mazibuko, Physiotherapist, Soweto

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng 

Great perspective on Marketing strategies. Good value for to help improve your practice in any Healthcare Profession.  Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Kirsten Laubscher, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Suretha Stoltz, Physiotherapist, Welkom

Excellent value for my practice.  Bianca Dwyer, Physiotherapist, Steelpoort

Good value for my practice.  Melissa Botha, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein 

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Erin Innocenzi, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


Is your practice wallowing in start-up mode? Would you like to grow your practice?

In many respects a medical practice is no different to any other small business: you have a service that you provide (sell) to customers (patients/clients).

To grow your practice/business, you need to market it effectively. This paper provides five key marketing steps that could unlock your business’ potential. 

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW To Ice or Not to Ice - The Pros and Cons

NEW To Ice or Not to Ice - The Pros and Cons

Testimonials:

Very interesting new way to look at using ice for acute injuries.  Excellent value for my practice.  Anine Nieman, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng 

Excellent value for my practice.  Karen Engelbrecht, Physiotherapist, Boksburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Marianne Fourie, Physiotherapist, Klerksdorp

Good value for my practice.  Toinette Mulder, Physiotherapist, Sonstraal Heights 

Good value for my practice.  Prenisha Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Roodepoort


Even in 2019, there is still a lot of confusion and misunderstanding about the simple process of using of ice after an injury or exercise, sometimes called ‘cryotherapy’.  Some say it’s the best thing ever and should be used all the time, others say it’s the worst thing ever and never to do it. So, the aim of this article is to see who is more right, or less wrong and decide if using ice is good, bad, or somewhere in-between.

3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance:  A Randomized Controlled Trial

Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessie  Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng 

Good value for my practice.  Carolyn Hall, Physiotherapist, Roodepoort 

Excellent value for my practice.  Pontsho Sharon Modau, Biokineticist, Kempton Park


Background: While static stretch (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and oscillatory physiological mobilization techniques are documented to have positive effects on a range of motion, there are no reports on the effect of dynamic oscillatory stretching (DOS), a technique that combines these three techniques, on hamstring extensibility.

Purpose: To determine whether DOS improves hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance to a greater degree than SS in asymptomatic young participants.

Methods: Sixty participants (47 females, 13 males, mean age 22 ± 1 years, height 166 ± 6 centimeters, body mass 67.6 ± 9.7 kg) completed a passive straight leg (SLR) to establish hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance as perceived by participants using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (SS or DOS) or a placebo control (20 per group). Tests were repeated immediately following and one hour after each intervention.

Results:  Immediately post-intervention, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring extensibility as measured by the SLR in both the SS and DOS groups, with the DOS group exhibiting a significantly greater increase than the SS group.  One hour post-intervention, hamstring extensibility in the DOS group remained elevated, while the SS group no longer differed from the control group. Furthermore, the stretch tolerance remained significantly elevated for the SS group, but there was no difference between the control and DOS groups.

Conclusion: DOS was more effective than SS at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring extensibility, and DOS demonstrated an increased stretch tolerance one-hour post-intervention.

3

CEUs

300.00

NEW - Common Biomechanical Errors in Runners

NEW - Common Biomechanical Errors in Runners

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Susan Sloan, Biokineticist, Benoni 

Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni 

Good value for my practice.  Crystal Pegram, Physiotherapist, Roodepoort 

Excellent value for my practice.  Cathy Du Toit, Physiotherapist, Midrand


Running injuries occur due to a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Running biomechanics and kinematic patterns contribute to the way the body absorbs ground forces. Poor running form can significantly increase the size of these forces and result in damaging tissue and joint loading. Identifying the primary error in a runners biomechanics can help to develop a management plan to comprehensively address their symptoms.

Aims

The aim of this course is to introduce the learner to common running biomechanical errors as seen in 2D and 3D Video analysis.

3

CEUs

NEW - Rehabilitation of Running Biomechanics

NEW - Rehabilitation of Running Biomechanics

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Dr Kirsten Evans, Chiropractor, Ballito 

Excellent value for my practice.  Susan Schoeman, Biokineticist, Paarl 

Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni 

Good value for my practice.  Mandy Banks, Biokineticist. Cape Town

 

Running injuries occur due to a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors and developing a comprehensive plan of care to rehabilitate a running injury can be a complicated process. A detailed assessment of the runner will help to identify the source of symptoms as well as any contributing factors involved. This will allow the therapist to develop an individualised plan of care that addresses the runners unique needs.

 

3

CEUs

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessie Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Ine Terblanche, Physiotherapist, Vanderbijlpark

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Chante du Preez, Physiotherapist, Kempton Park

Excellent value for my practice.  Johann Wessels, Physiotherapist, East London

Good value for my practice.  Lara Brookstein, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

Running is a hugely popular activity – but many runners overdo it, suffer injuries as a result, and then turn to us as clinicians to sort them out – as quickly as possible. 

This course will help you learn about the common risk factors for running overuse and how to prevent them. 

Also described are the most common running-related injuries including patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes and their biomechanics and prevention.

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ilene Odendaal, Physiotherapist, Brakpan 

Covered the essential biomechanics  and its like a refresher course.  Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni 

Great refresher on biomechanics.  Good value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Rdige

Good value for my practice. Mojalefa Sebetlela, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

Good value for my practice.  Trevor Hutton, Biokineticist, Richards Bay 

 

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet. 

This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet.


This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Footwear Selection

Footwear Selection

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Refilwe Mhlabane, Podiatrist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Annarie Donald, Biokineticist, Potchefstroom 

Good value for my practice.  Esterina Pretorius, Physiotherapist, Sasolburg


Matching a foot and shoe is a process that requires thought, scientific measurement, and rationale. Though the research on shoe selection is still incomplete, shoe selection based on foot structure and measures of forefoot orientation, arch height and rear foot standing posture can aid in injury prevention.

This course offers information on the types of running shoes, arationale and overall paradigm for shoe fitting using scientific methodology, as well as scientific literature related to orthotics.

3

CEUs

400.00

Groin Pain:  A View from Below

Groin Pain: A View from Below

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

Thank you so much - was a good refresher course summing up all aspects.  Good value for my practice.  Anni Gerryts, Biokineticist, Pretoria 

Great article - groin pain is often considered as not something a podiatrist would treat. I've had loads of success in treating groins as part of the team attending to the patient.  Excellent value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Ridge


Chronic groin pain is a common problem in athletes. The multifactorial nature and the various anatomical structures that contribute to groin pain have made the condition difficult to prevent and manage. Early detection and intervention are the keys to optimal management and prevention of chronic injury. This course provides the clinician and podiatrist in particular with an understanding of the entity, focuses on the biomechanical risks associated with groin pain from a lower extremity perspective and introduces the role of podiatry as an effective adjunct to the multi-disciplinary groin management team.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

The Irritable Baby

The Irritable Baby

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Desireé Louw, Physiotherapist, Pretoria 

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Bierman, Physiotherapist, Tzaneen

 

Infantile colic is a term used by many to describe a consistently unsettled baby. But in truth, it is so much more than that. 

Discover what is a classical clinical presentation, how to diagnosis it and what many causes may be. From protein and carbohydrate intolerances to gastroesophageal reflux and intussusception, you will learn how to identify it, when to refer out and how to manage it from a chiropractic perspective.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) is the name given to a common but complex biological disorder characterised by excessive inattentiveness, impulsiveness or hyperactivity that significantly impairs a child’s functioning in a number of environments.  This course will describe the behaviours associated with AD/HD, diagnostic criteria, and Etiology including educational and family factors.  

The management programme that appears to have the best chance of success uses a combination of therapeutic approaches.  The role of medication will be discussed in detail.  Other approaches recommend the education of parents and improved communication between the parents, the treating doctor and the school.  

3

CEUs

400.00

Cancer in Children

Cancer in Children

While paediatric cancer represents only a small proportion of childhood illness, it remains the second most common cause of death behind trauma in children aged 1-14 years.  

This course will equip you with a working knowledge of the common clinical presentations of paediatric malignancies and an understanding of the principles of diagnosis and management of cancer in children.                                                                                      

3

CEUs

400.00

Paediatric Nutrition

Paediatric Nutrition

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Dr Patrick Bell, Chiropractor, Rondebosch 

 

Chiropractors have a critical role to play in the field of paediatric nutrition. 

This course will provide you with the general principles of nutritional practice and the fundamental strategies used to measure, assess and advise patients accordingly. 

On completion of this course, you should be able to provide patients and their families with sound, reliable information that will impact their health in the longer term including:  knowledge of the nutritional requirements of infants and children; best feeding practices for the various age levels in paediatrics;  and techniques for collecting and assessing food intake information. 

This course will also familiarise you with the more common disorders of metabolism and nutrition that may be encountered in your practice.

3

CEUs

400.00

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 1

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 1

Learn about Low GI anti-inflammatory diet.

Amazing evidence-based clinical tips: 

  • Does diet influence systemic inflammation and if so, how?
  • Insulin Resistance, an important factor in many pathologies;
  • How to recognise Insulin Resistance; 
  • Benefits of a Low Glycemic Index (GI) diet;

Important components of a Low GI, anti-inflammatory diet.

3

CEUs

400.00

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 2

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 2

Discover:

  • How dietary recommendations help reduce systematic inflammation;
  • The effect of injury on energy and protein requirements;
  • What happens to patient outcome and athletic performance when the metabolism is supported with the right macronutrients; and
  • Bioavailability of different mineral sources.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 3

Nutrition and Patient Outcome - Part 3

Testimonial:

Very interesting.  Rosey McLean, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

Prescribe Nutrition Treatment protocols for your musculoskeletal patients presenting with: 

  • Degenerative Joint Disease;
  • Osteoporosis;
  • Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue and Myofascial Pain Tunnel Syndrome Syndrome and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; and
  • more

3

CEUs

400.00

Protein Influences on Bone Health

Protein Influences on Bone Health

Protein. It’s been identified as being both detrimental and beneficial to bone
health.

Given the high prevalence of osteoporosis and sarcopenia, should health
professionals recommend an increase in protein intakes? Well, it depends
on a variety of factors.

This course briefly describes these factors and their relation to bone health.
Loss of bone mass (osteopenia) and loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) that
occur with age are also discussed in depth.

3

CEUs

400.00

What is Muscle Energy Techniques?

What is Muscle Energy Techniques?

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice, Carolyn Hall, Physiotherapist, Roodepoort 

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Nicola Brown, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

Good value for my practice.  Heather Auditore, Physiotherapist, Groot Jongensfontein

 

METs – a class of soft tissue osteopathic manual techniques that incorporate precisely directed and controlled, patient initiated, isometrical or isotonic contractions – encompass, proven, valuable modalities that every manual clinician should have in his or his or her toolbox. 

MET is effective for both acute patients or those with chronic conditions and actively involves empowering patients to take charge of their own recovery (osteopenia) and loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) that occur with age are also discussed in depth.

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 1

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 1

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Nicolien Brink, Biokineticist, Pretoria

 

Research relating to the most effective application, mechanism of action and clinical relevance is discussed in three parts, each providing greater insight into the techniques and their application in different circumstances.

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 2

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 2

Research relating to the most effective application, mechanism of action and clinical relevance is discussed in three parts, each providing greater insight into the techniques and their application in different circumstances

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 3

Muscle Energy Techniques Efficacy and Research - Part 3

Research relating to the most effective application, mechanism of action and clinical relevance is discussed in three parts, each providing greater insight into the techniques and their application in different circumstances

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment and Muscle Energy Techniques Treatment of Postural Muscles: Introduction to Assessments and Treatment

Assessment and Muscle Energy Techniques Treatment of Postural Muscles: Introduction to Assessments and Treatment

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Eileen Murray, Physiotherapist, Hillcrest

 

This on-line course provides the practitioner with invaluable insight into how MET can be used across a range of conditions. These include myofascial pain and fibromyalgia.

It also describes what happens in the muscles during MET techniques, and explains how MET can be used to treat joint pathologies and post-treatment discomfort. And there’s more… you’ll learn more about the evaluation of muscle shortness, and use of MET and stretching.

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Hamstring and Adductors, Gastrocnemius and Soleus

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Hamstring and Adductors, Gastrocnemius and Soleus

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town  

Very informative!  Excellent value for my practice.  Paula Foster, Physiotherapist, Pietermaritzburg 

Excellent explanations of treatment methods for tougher injuries.  Good value for my practice.  Bronwyn Wissekerke, Biokineticist, Richards Bay

Good value for my practice.  Martin Freyer, Physiotherapist, Windhoek 

Excellent value for my practice.  Exaggerate Mashale, Physiotherapist, Acornhoek   

Good explanation how to use MET and differentiate between the involved muscle groups.  Good value for my practice.  Ilze Annandale, Physiotherapist, Krugersdorp

Good value for my practice.  Zelda Lamprecht, Biokineticist, Centurion

Excellent value for my practice.  Mzamo Madolo, Physiotherapist, Midrand 

Good value for my practice.  Precious Lebea, Biokineticist, Modjadjiskloof 

Good value for my practice.  Conrad Wagner, Biokineticist, Swakopmund

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

  • gastrocnemius and soleus
  • medial hamstrings
  • adductors (pectineus, adductors brevis, magnus and longus) short and long adductors

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Rectus Femoris and Iliopsoas

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Rectus Femoris and Iliopsoas

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jomari Vosloo, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein  

Good value for my practice.  Surene Janse van Vuuren, Biokineticist, Brakpan

Good value for my practice.  Jodri Dawkins, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

  • rectus femoris and iliopsoas

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Hamstrings and TFL

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Hamstrings and TFL

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Jomari Vosloo, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein 

Excellent value for my practice.  Elaine Cahill, Physiotherapist, Walvis Bay

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

  • Hamstrings:

  • Lower and upper hamstrings

  • Tensor fascial lata

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Piriformis and Quadratus Lumborum

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Piriformis and Quadratus Lumborum

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Anja Marais, Biokineticist, Somerset West

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

  • Piriformis
  • Quadrates lumborum

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Spine: Paravertebral Muscles

Muscle Energy Techniques: Spine: Paravertebral Muscles

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following spinal muscles:

Paravertebral muscles
Erector spinae muscle
Thoraco lumbar facia and muscles
Erector spinae muscles of the neck
Deep neck flexors

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Upper Quarter: Upper Trapezius, Scalenus & SCM

Muscle Energy Techniques: Upper Quarter: Upper Trapezius, Scalenus & SCM

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessica Krone, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following tight upper quarter muscles:

Part 1:

  • Pectoralis major
  • Latissimus dorsi
  • Upper trapezius
  • Scalenes
  • Sternocleidomastoid

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Upper Quarter: Levator Scapula, Infra & Supra Spinatus & Subscapularis

Muscle Energy Techniques: Upper Quarter: Levator Scapula, Infra & Supra Spinatus & Subscapularis

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Elaine Cahill, Physiotherapist, Walvis Bay

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following tight upper quarter muscles:

Part 2:

  • Levator scapulae
  • Infraspinatus
  • Subscapularis
  • Supraspinatus
  • Flexors of the arm
  • Flexors of the forearm
  • Biceps brachii

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - A Comprehensive Yoga Program Improves Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Low Back Pain:  RCT

NEW - A Comprehensive Yoga Program Improves Pain, Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Low Back Pain: RCT

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

 

Previously, outpatient Yoga programs for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) lasting several months have been found to reduce pain, analgesic requirement and disability, and improve spinal mobility. This study evaluated changes in pain, anxiety, depression and spinal mobility for chronic LBP patients on short-term, residential Yoga and physical exercise programs, including comprehensive yoga lifestyle modifications.

3

CEUs

400.00

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Muscle-Nerve Physiology and Contraction

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Muscle-Nerve Physiology and Contraction

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Ndamulelo Nemakonde, Physiotherapist, Thohoyandou

 

One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope.

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research.

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.

3

CEUs

400.00

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Pathogenesis of Myofascial Trigger Point

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Pathogenesis of Myofascial Trigger Point

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Surien van Dyk, Community Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Muhammed Behardien, Community Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Mercy Josaya, Physiotherapist, Gaborone 

Good value for my practice.  Cayley Melrose, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Kago Mmapatsi, Physiotherapist, Francistown 

Good value for my practice.  Debbi Joy Muller, Biokineticist, South Port 

Good value for my practice.  Cynthia Sebata, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

 

One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope. 

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research. 

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.

3

CEUs

400.00

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Clinical Symptoms and Physical Findings

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Clinical Symptoms and Physical Findings

One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope.

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research.

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.

3

CEUs

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Referred Pain Pattern, Classifications of MFTP's and Myofascial Diagnosis

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Referred Pain Pattern, Classifications of MFTP's and Myofascial Diagnosis

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Raeesah Sahib, Physiotherapist 

Excellent value for my practice.  Jason Scott, Chiropractor, Douglasdale

Good value for my practice.  Muhammed Behardien, Community Service Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Kago Mmapatsi, Physiotherapist, Francistown

Good value for my practice.  Debbi Joy Muller, Biokineticist, South Port 

Good value for my practice.  Cynthia Sebata, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope.

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research.

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.



3

CEUs

400.00

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Myofascial Treatment

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Myofascial Treatment

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Reinette Hattingh, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

 

One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope.

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research.

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.

3

CEUs

400.00

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy:  Perpetuating Factors and Dry Needling

Trigger Points and Myofascial Therapy: Perpetuating Factors and Dry Needling

One of the most rewarding experiences in physiotherapy is to transform a patient’s agonising pain into a feeling of comfort, relaxation and hope.

Myofascial pain syndrome is a difficult and frustrating condition. These courses provide insight into all aspects of the condition including some of the latest thinking and research.

They also offer important diagnostic tools and excellent, proven treatment options. For maximum benefit take all six courses offered.

3

CEUs

Care of the Pregnant Patient:  Part 1

Care of the Pregnant Patient: Part 1

In part 1 of this 2 part course, you will learn why any women trying to get pregnant should consider chiropractic care as part of her preconception preparation, how to take an appropriate history from a pregnant patient, what potential red flags to look out for and advice to give. You will also learn about appropriate physical assessment through the trimesters, including vital sign, appropriate weight gain, cardio and respiratory and of course neurological. This course will give you the confidence you need when caring for pregnant women; right the way through their pregnancy from preconception to birth.

 

 

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Care of the Pregnant Patient:  Part 2

Care of the Pregnant Patient: Part 2

In 2 part course, you will learn why any women trying to get pregnant should consider chiropractic care as part of her preconception preparation, how to take an appropriate history from a pregnant patient, what potential red flags to look out for and advice to give. You will also learn about appropriate physical assessment through the trimesters, including vital sign, appropriate weight gain, cardio and respiratory and of course neurological. This course will give you the confidence you need when caring for pregnant women; right the way through their pregnancy from preconception to birth.

 

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Stabbed in the Back:  Taking the Knife out of Back Pain

Stabbed in the Back: Taking the Knife out of Back Pain

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Riali Roos, Physiotherapist, Fairland 

Good value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Liezel Snyman, Physiotherapist, Kakamas

 

Are common treatments for low back pain - more MRIs, strong pain- medication, injection therapy and surgery – working? And if they are, why has the number of LBP sufferers remained stagnant? Is it because LBP care is becoming progressively discordant with clinical guidelines? Is there more to LBP than meets the eye? 

This course will critically reassess LBP and consider other factors that could be influencing your patients’ LBP – and give you tools to approach LBP differently.

3

CEUs

400.00

A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon

A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon

The theory of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) caused by trigger points (TrPs) has long been accepted by many practitioners who work hard to treat this condition. 

However, the authors of this article maintain that there is no scientific basis for this diagnosis. So what now? What if patients present with the clinical phenomena associated with MPS and TrPs? 

This paper looks at all the evidence relating to the subject and offers plausible explanations and considerations for the treatment of MPS patients.

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest


3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 1 - Introduction

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 1 - Introduction

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest 

Good value for my practice.  Byron Tarr, Biokineticist, Sasolburg

 

The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature. 

The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system. 

The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.


3

CEUs

400.00

Management of Neuropathic Pain - Part 1

Management of Neuropathic Pain - Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Candyce Hall, Biokineticist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Marianne Fourie, Physiotherapist, Klerksdorp

Excellent value for my practice.  Nicola Brown, Physiotherapist, Grahamstown 

Excellent value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

What is the best treatment methodology for peripheral neuropathic pain or pain resulting from injury to nerve roots or peripheral nerve trunks? 

How best should the symptoms of clinical manifestations of peripheral neuropathic pain be described? This course examines some conservative options for treatment and raises questions about their efficacy. Not all patients, it seems, will respond equally to neurodynamic mobilization techniques and different treatment parameters. The course will discuss the way in which interventions can be individualized to address the nuances of each patient’s presentation of peripheral neuropathic pain. 

Part 1 & 2 must be taken together.

3

CEUs

400.00

Management of Neuropathic Pain - Part 2

Management of Neuropathic Pain - Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Stefanie Lochner, Physiotherapist, Saldanha 

Excellent value for my practice.  Marianne Fourie, Physiotherapist, Klerksdorp 

Good value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


What is the best treatment methodology for peripheral neuropathic pain or pain resulting from injury to nerve roots or peripheral nerve trunks? 

How best should the symptoms of clinical manifestations of peripheral neuropathic pain be described? This course examines some conservative options for treatment and raises questions about their efficacy. Not all patients, it seems, will respond equally to neurodynamic mobilization techniques and different treatment parameters. The course will discuss the way in which interventions can be individualized to address the nuances of each patient’s presentation of peripheral neuropathic pain.

Part 1 & 2 must be taken together



3

CEUs

400.00

Pain and the Nervous System

Pain and the Nervous System

This course challenges current clinical models and systems for assessing and managing on-going pain states. It evaluates the current tissue based/modality based paradigm for pain treatment.


A mature organism model is presented as a workable concept incorporating mechanisms of pain into the broad science of stress biology and the biopsychosocial model of pain.

3

CEUs

400.00

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Can Physiotherapy be used to manage adult Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type One?


A Systematic literature review is used in an attempt to clarify this issue. Some of the findings may be surprising. In fact, no evidence was found to support treatments frequently recommended in clinical guidelines for treatment of pain in adult CRPS-1 patients.

3

CEUs

400.00

Applied Biomechanics of the Nervous System - Part 1

Applied Biomechanics of the Nervous System - Part 1

These correspondence courses will provide you with practical information on the concept of neurodynamics;

  • General layout of the nervous system in relation to the musculoskeletal system;
  • Tension, sliding and compression as a mechanical function of the nervous system;
  • How nerves move and nervous system responses to movement;
  • Nervous system physiology; and
  • Neurodynamics sequencing.

The information provided will assist you with the clinical reasoning for treatment of a patient with neural tissue pain disorders.

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Jeanne Thana van Rooyen, Biokineticist, George 

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest

Good value for my practice.  Marianne Fourie, Physiotherapist, Klerksdorp

3

CEUs

400.00

Applied Biomechanics of the Nervous System - Part 2

Applied Biomechanics of the Nervous System - Part 2

These correspondence courses will provide you with practical information on the concept of neurodynamics;

  • General layout of the nervous system in relation to the musculoskeletal system;
  • Tension, sliding and compression as a mechanical function of the nervous system;
  • How nerves move and nervous system responses to movement;
  • Nervous system physiology; and
  • Neurodynamics sequencing.

The information provided will assist you with the clinical reasoning for treatment of a patient with neural tissue pain disorders.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest

3

CEUs

400.00

Applied Regional Biomechanics of the Nervous System

Applied Regional Biomechanics of the Nervous System

This correspondence course covers essential information regarding biomechanics of the neural system of the spine, shoulder, hip and knee regions.


In particular, this manual provides a detailed discussion of neural tissue biomechanics and implication for treatment of spinal and peripheral joint movement.

3

CEUs

NEW - Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI)

NEW - Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI)

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Patricia Gouws, Biokineticist, Boksburg 

Good value for my practice.  Alison Toet, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Dr Tamsyn Dixon, Chiropractor, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Colleen Sturrock, Psychologist, Cape Town


This online learning describes Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), which is the study of the interaction between psychological processes and the nervous and immune systems of the human body.  PNI takes an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating psychology, neuroscience, immunology, physiology, genetics and pharmacology.  The course also discusses the history/origin of PNI, the immune-brain loop and understanding stress and immune function.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Psychoneuroimmunology Psychology’s Gateway  to the Biomedical Future (* Fast Track)

NEW - Psychoneuroimmunology Psychology’s Gateway to the Biomedical Future (* Fast Track)

Testimonials:

Valuable information to remember when working with clients.  Excellent value for my practice.  Anne Reynolds, Occupational Therapist, Randburg 

Good value for my practice.  Jacqueline Watts, Physiotherapist, Pretoria 

Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle Stewart, Psychologist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Lisa Lettenga, Physiotherapist, Erasmuskloof, Pretoria 

Good value for my practice.  Bridget O'Neill Kruger, Psychologist, Cape Town

An interesting article, particularly around vaccine efficacy and stress responses.   Tali Lanesman, Psychologist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Nordlind Cazimira Fouche, Psychologist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Swart, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Amy-Lea Stranack, Physiotherapist, Ballito 

Excellent value for my practice.  Henri de Wet, Psychologist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Carla McIntosh, Counselor, Port Elizabeth

 

How do stressful events and negative emotions influence the immune system, and how big are the effects? New multidisciplinary permutations provide fresh vistas and emphasize the importance of training psychologists more broadly so that they will be central and essential players in the advancement of biomedical science.

*Fast track = fast track your learning with our short online courses

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Inflammation through a Psychoneuroimmunological Lens

NEW - Inflammation through a Psychoneuroimmunological Lens

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Anne Reynolds, Occupational Therapist, Randburg 

The article gave me a good broad understanding of the impact of various biological and psycho-social influences on Inflammation.  Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle Stewart, Psychologist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Bridget O'Neill Kruger, Psychologist, Cape Town 

Very interesting to once again be presented with evidence that everything about us is connected, biological, psychological, psychosocial, health behaviours, SES.  Excellent value for my practice.  Lisa Lettenga, Physiotherapist, Erasmuskloof, Pretoria 

Very interesting article as we don't always realise how inflammation is impacted and how to influence it. Great to have practical aspects that one can bring into your practice to help your patients.  Excellent value for my practice.  Jacqueline Watts, Physiotherapist, Pretoria 

Excellent value for my practice.  Avril Cowlin, Psychologist, Perm Gardens 

Good value for my practice.  Carla McIntosh, Counselor, Port Elizabeth


In this on-line course, we use a PNI lens to understand and describe the complex influences of biology and psychology on inflammation.  Inflammation is an underlying etiological factor in many chronic diseases.  

A brief description of brain-immune communication is first introduced as background, followed by a summary of inflammation's effect on health.  The biological, psychological, and psychosocial influences on inflammation are then discussed, followed by a review of inflammation and cellular aging.

3

CEUs

400.00

Depression and Immune Function Central Pathways to Morbidity and Mortality

Depression and Immune Function Central Pathways to Morbidity and Mortality

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Prompts to google increased the learning experiences.  Good value for my practice.  Kerrie Austin, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Machteld-Marie Butner, Occupational Therapist, Paardekraal  

Good value for my practice.  Ingrid Artus, Psychologist, Roodepoort 

Excellent value for my practice.  Dr Lizbé Schoeman, Psychologist, Vanderbijlpark


The increased morbidity and mortality associated with depression is substantial. In this paper, we review evidence suggesting that depression contributes to disease and death through immune dysregulation. This review focuses on recent human studies addressing the impact of depression on immune function, and the health consequences of those changes. There is growing evidence that depression can directly stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines that influence a spectrum of conditions associated with aging, including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, periodontal disease, frailty, and functional decline. 

Additionally, depression can down-regulate the cellular immune response; as a consequence, processes such as prolonged infection and delayed wound healing that fuel sustained proinflammatory cytokine production may be promoted by depression. These direct and indirect processes pose the greatest health risks for older adults who already show age-related increases in proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, aging interacts with depression to enhance risks for morbidity and mortality.

3

CEUs

400.00

Out of Balance A New Look at Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity

Out of Balance A New Look at Chronic Stress, Depression and Immunity

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Yeshanta, Homeopath, Boksburg 

Good value for my practice.  Ingrid Artus, Psychologist, Roodepoort

Good value for my practice.  Candyce Hall, Biokineticist, Cape Town

 

Chronic stress is typically associated with suppression of the immune system, including impaired responses to infectious disease and delayed wound healing.  Recent work suggests that stress and depression can enhance production of proinflammatory cytokines, substances that regulate the body’s immune response to infection and injury. We provide a broad framework relating stress and depression to a range of diseases whose onset and course may be influenced by proinflammatory cytokines, particularly the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6).  IL-6 has been linked to a spectrum of chronic diseases associated with aging. Production of proinflammatory cytokines that influence these, and other conditions can be directly stimulated by chronic stress and depression.  

We suggest that a key pathway through which chronic stress and depression influence health outcomes involves proinflammatory cytokines. We discuss the evidence for relationships between psychosocial factors and proinflammatory cytokines, and important health implications of these findings.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Advances in Neuroscience Imply that Harmful Experiments in Dogs are Unethical

NEW - Advances in Neuroscience Imply that Harmful Experiments in Dogs are Unethical

Functional MRI of fully awake and unrestrained dog ’volunteers’ has been proven an effective tool in understanding the neural circuitry and functioning of the canine brain.  Studies show that there exists a striking similarity between dogs and humans in the functioning of the caudate nucleus (associated with pleasure and emotion), and dogs experience positive emotions, empathic-like responses and demonstrate human bonding which, some scientists claim, may be at least comparable with human children.  This article therefore contends that using dogs in invasive and/or harmful research, and toxicity testing, cannot be ethically justifiable.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

0.00

To stretch or not to stretch?  Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

To stretch or not to stretch? Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Cassie van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, East Londen 

Good value for my practice.  Lara Leech, Biokineticist, Roodepoort


Static Stretch (SS) does not appear to reduce injury risk and any effect on earlier return to sport is of marginal clinical significance.  In contrast, a graduated strength training programme appears to significantly reduce injury risk and significantly reduce the time to return to sport after injury.

Therefore, the only area in which SS might seem to offer a specific advantage is in the area of increasing flexibility.  However, there remains a lack of evidence that gains are superior to those of a strength training programme. Even if strength training is eventually confirmed as being inferior to SS at increasing flexibility, the fact that strength training improves performance, pain, disability, injury and return to sport rates mean strength training must be a mainstay of athletic development and training, in contrast to SS.

3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance:  A Randomized Controlled Trial

Dynamic Oscillatory Stretching Efficacy on Hamstring Extensibility and Stretch Tolerance: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessie  Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng 

Good value for my practice.  Carolyn Hall, Physiotherapist, Roodepoort 

Excellent value for my practice.  Pontsho Sharon Modau, Biokineticist, Kempton Park


Background: While static stretch (SS), proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and oscillatory physiological mobilization techniques are documented to have positive effects on a range of motion, there are no reports on the effect of dynamic oscillatory stretching (DOS), a technique that combines these three techniques, on hamstring extensibility.

Purpose: To determine whether DOS improves hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance to a greater degree than SS in asymptomatic young participants.

Methods: Sixty participants (47 females, 13 males, mean age 22 ± 1 years, height 166 ± 6 centimeters, body mass 67.6 ± 9.7 kg) completed a passive straight leg (SLR) to establish hamstring extensibility and stretch tolerance as perceived by participants using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups (SS or DOS) or a placebo control (20 per group). Tests were repeated immediately following and one hour after each intervention.

Results:  Immediately post-intervention, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring extensibility as measured by the SLR in both the SS and DOS groups, with the DOS group exhibiting a significantly greater increase than the SS group.  One hour post-intervention, hamstring extensibility in the DOS group remained elevated, while the SS group no longer differed from the control group. Furthermore, the stretch tolerance remained significantly elevated for the SS group, but there was no difference between the control and DOS groups.

Conclusion: DOS was more effective than SS at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring extensibility, and DOS demonstrated an increased stretch tolerance one-hour post-intervention.

3

CEUs

300.00

A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon

A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon

The theory of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) caused by trigger points (TrPs) has long been accepted by many practitioners who work hard to treat this condition. 

However, the authors of this article maintain that there is no scientific basis for this diagnosis. So what now? What if patients present with the clinical phenomena associated with MPS and TrPs? 

This paper looks at all the evidence relating to the subject and offers plausible explanations and considerations for the treatment of MPS patients.

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest


3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 2 – Basic Principles for Exercises

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 2 – Basic Principles for Exercises

The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Byron Tarr, Biokineticist, Sasolburg

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Kirstin Shearar, Chiropractor, Hillcrest

3

CEUs

400.00

Ethical Considerations in the Treatment of Children:  Children Rights

Ethical Considerations in the Treatment of Children: Children Rights

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Daniella Ferguson, Occupational Therapist, Pretoria

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng

Excellent value for my practice.  Sthembiso Masondo, Physiotherapist, Newcastle

Excellent value for my practice.  Verona Cronje, Physiotherapist, George

Good value for my practice.  Heather Auditore, Physiotherapist, Groot Jongensfontein 

Good value for my practice.  Fatima Pahad, Physiotherapist, Beijing 

Good value for my practice.  Bernita Thulsie, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Andrea Becker, Physiotherapist, La Lucia

 

Children are not just a smaller version of adults and it is often difficult to determine when actions are truly "in the best interest of the child". When should we intervene and when are children capable of making their own decisions?

How much information do children need? Is it always in the best interest of the child to have the parent present during treatments? 

The purpose of this online course is to equip healthcare providers with the knowledge to adequately address the rights of children in healthcare.  

After completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Understand national and international legal frameworks for the rights of children in healthcare.
  • Reflect critically on the rights of children in healthcare.
  • Advocate for the rights of these children.
  • Understand the healthcare professional dilemma to report or not report child abuse.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Achilles Tendinopathy

Achilles Tendinopathy

Testimonials: 

Excellent value for my practice.  Jacqui Botha, Physiotherapist, Plettenberg Bay

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Linda Birkenstock, Podiatrist, Polokwane 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Frederick Colyn, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein 

Good value for my practice.  Melinda Snyders, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

Good value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


This e-Learning course summarises the tendinopathy continuum and articulates the authors' clinical reasoning and hands-on experience managing Achilles tendinopathy. We outline graded loading concepts while emphasising that relying on recipes is likely to fail. We also provide a perspective on the role of central pain processing and peripheral input from nociceptive fibres in the context of tendinopathy. 

Rehabilitation should be tailored to address identified impairments (muscle bulk asymmetries, kinetic chain dysfunction, tolerance of energy storage and release in the Achilles tendon), and progressively work toward movements and activities relevant for the individual's sport or daily activities.

3

CEUs

400.00

To stretch or not to stretch?  Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

To stretch or not to stretch? Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Cassie van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, East Londen 

Good value for my practice.  Lara Leech, Biokineticist, Roodepoort


Static Stretch (SS) does not appear to reduce injury risk and any effect on earlier return to sport is of marginal clinical significance.  In contrast, a graduated strength training programme appears to significantly reduce injury risk and significantly reduce the time to return to sport after injury.

Therefore, the only area in which SS might seem to offer a specific advantage is in the area of increasing flexibility.  However, there remains a lack of evidence that gains are superior to those of a strength training programme. Even if strength training is eventually confirmed as being inferior to SS at increasing flexibility, the fact that strength training improves performance, pain, disability, injury and return to sport rates mean strength training must be a mainstay of athletic development and training, in contrast to SS.

3

CEUs

400.00

Thinking out of the Box:  The Myth of Core Stability

Thinking out of the Box: The Myth of Core Stability

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Candice Kretzmann, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Candice Scott, Physiotherapist, Durbanville


The principle of core stability has gained wide acceptance for the prevention of injury in training and as a treatment modality for rehabilitation of various musculoskeletal conditions, in particular of the lower back. There has been surprisingly little criticism of this approach to date.  

This article re-examines the original findings and the principles of core stability/spinal stabilisation approaches and how well they fare within the wider knowledge of motor control, prevention of injury and rehabilitation of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems following injury.

3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 3 – Sample Exercises

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 3 – Sample Exercises

The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Ethical Dilemmas and the Sports Team Doctor

Ethical Dilemmas and the Sports Team Doctor

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth 

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

 

There are many ethical dilemmas that are unique to sports medicine because of the unusual clinical environment of caring for players within the context of a team whose primary objective is to win. Sports doctors and health care providers are frequently under intense pressure, whether implicit or explicit, from management, coaches, trainers and agents, to improve the performance of the athlete in the short term rather than consider the long-term sequelae of such decisions. In this course, a number of ethical principles and how they relate to sports medicine are discussed. A list of guidelines has been drawn up to offer some support to doctors and health care providers facing an ethical dilemma, the most important of which is ‘do not hand over your responsibility to the individual player.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 1: Static, Ballistic and PNF Stretches

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 1: Static, Ballistic and PNF Stretches

The science of sports injury prevention has grown exponentially over the past two decades. We know that interventions can prevent major knee, ankle and other injuries.

This course will help you to help your sports clients to reduce the risk of injury. You will gain a thorough understanding of how sports injuries occur. Then you will gain in-depth knowledge of the factors that can reduce the risk of injury – warm-up, stretching, taping and bracing, equipment, surfaces, training, envelope of function and the central governor model for the limit of performance and their appropriate use.                                                                         

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Supporting the Body's Recovery Process Following Injury, Surgery or Immobilisation

Supporting the Body's Recovery Process Following Injury, Surgery or Immobilisation

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Bronwyn van den Berg, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth


Stiffness and restricted range of movement are the most common clinical presentations second to pain. This on-line course is ideal for all therapists who would like to help others to recover or improve their ease and range of movement.

Are you familiar with the physiological events and psychological impact on body and mind following injury, immobilization or surgery and what is the best approach to support the body’s natural recovery process.

3

CEUs

400.00

It’s time for a change with the Management of Low Back Pain.

It’s time for a change with the Management of Low Back Pain.

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Chanel Steyn, Biokineticist, Elarduspark 

Excellent value for my practice.  Lance Stevens, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

 

Management of chronic low back pain and leg pain requires a multifactorial approach. Low back pain can be difficult to treat as the clinician not only has to identify the underlying causative factors to restore homeostasis to the system, but also has to ensure that the treatment does not unnecessarily exacerbate the symptoms. 

The aim of treatment is to increase the active control of the passively unstable and associated areas so that the patient can operate within an increased envelope of function, and with minimised symptom recurrences. The training must be simple, requiring minimal equipment so that it is readily accessible to the individual and can be practised frequently. As chronic problems are never cured, only managed, therapists and patients must manage the symptoms over the long term.

3

CEUs

400.00

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models:  Part 4 – Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization Exercise Modifications for Sports Techniques

Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization: Exercises Based on Developmental Kinesiology Models: Part 4 – Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization Exercise Modifications for Sports Techniques

The etiology of musculoskeletal pain, in particular back pain, is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint and the influence of external forces (i.e., loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patient’s own musculature.

The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. The approach of Kolár to dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system.

The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the first year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes, and functional joint centration from a “neurodevelopmental” paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers and to assist in finding the “key link” of dysfunction. The treatment approach is based on the ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns.

The primary goal of treatment is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS treatment concept, patient education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Ethical Challenges in the 21st Century:  Part 1

Ethical Challenges in the 21st Century: Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Jomari Vosloo, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein

Good value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

 

Ethics relates to far more than a simple understanding of that which is legally permissible in society.  A nuanced understanding of ethical issues adds depth and meaning to what it takes to live as a mature human in an increasingly complex world.  As healthcare practitioners we owe it to ourselves and our patients to act ethically and responsibly so as to benefit all those who seek our help.  

This course provides the perfect introduction to the ethical challenges we face in our practices.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 2: Active Isolated Stretching as a Therapeutic Modality, Illustrated Stretching Programme

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 2: Active Isolated Stretching as a Therapeutic Modality, Illustrated Stretching Programme

The science of sports injury prevention has grown exponentially over the past two decades. We know that interventions can prevent major knee, ankle and other injuries. This course will help you to help your sports clients to reduce the risk of injury. You will gain a thorough understanding of how sports injuries occur. Then you will gain in-depth knowledge of the factors that can reduce the risk of injury – warm-up, stretching, taping and bracing, equipment, surfaces, training, envelope of function and the central governor model for the limit of performance and their appropriate use.

3

CEUs

400.00

Care of the Pregnant Patient:  Part 1

Care of the Pregnant Patient: Part 1

In part 1 of this 2 part course, you will learn why any women trying to get pregnant should consider chiropractic care as part of her preconception preparation, how to take an appropriate history from a pregnant patient, what potential red flags to look out for and advice to give. You will also learn about appropriate physical assessment through the trimesters, including vital sign, appropriate weight gain, cardio and respiratory and of course neurological. This course will give you the confidence you need when caring for pregnant women; right the way through their pregnancy from preconception to birth.

 

 

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Physical Activity and Healthy Ageing

Physical Activity and Healthy Ageing

Does physical activity have an impact on the quality of life of the elderly?


What if the individual only takes up physical activity later in life?


Previous studies have examined the effects of mid-life physical activity on healthy ageing, but not the effects of taking up activity later in life. This on-line course examines the association between physical activity and healthy ageing over 8 years of follow-up for a group of individuals aged at around 63 years at the start of the study.

3

CEUs

400.00

Ethical Challenges in the 21st Century:  Part 2

Ethical Challenges in the 21st Century: Part 2

Ethics relates to far more than a simple understanding of that which is legally permissible in society.  A nuanced understanding of ethical issues adds depth and meaning to what it takes to live as a mature human in an increasingly complex world.  As healthcare practitioners we owe it to ourselves and our patients to act ethically and responsibly so as to benefit all those who seek our help. 

This course provides the perfect introduction to the ethical challenges we face in our practices.

 

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

Principles of Injury Prevention:  Part 3:  Equipment, Running Shoes, Spikes, Boots and Ski.  Tennis Racquets and Appropriate Surfaces

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 3: Equipment, Running Shoes, Spikes, Boots and Ski. Tennis Racquets and Appropriate Surfaces

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, JHB 

Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni

 

The science of sports injury prevention has grown exponentially over the past two decades. We know that interventions can prevent major knee, ankle and other injuries. This course will help you to help your sports clients to reduce the risk of injury. You will gain a thorough understanding of how sports injuries occur. Then you will gain in-depth knowledge of the factors that can reduce the risk of injury – warm-up, stretching, taping and bracing, equipment, surfaces, training, envelope of function and the central governor model for the limit of performance and their appropriate use.                                                                       

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Care of the Pregnant Patient:  Part 2

Care of the Pregnant Patient: Part 2

In 2 part course, you will learn why any women trying to get pregnant should consider chiropractic care as part of her preconception preparation, how to take an appropriate history from a pregnant patient, what potential red flags to look out for and advice to give. You will also learn about appropriate physical assessment through the trimesters, including vital sign, appropriate weight gain, cardio and respiratory and of course neurological. This course will give you the confidence you need when caring for pregnant women; right the way through their pregnancy from preconception to birth.

 

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Movement and Physical Activity: Targets for Treatment

Movement and Physical Activity: Targets for Treatment

The aim of this course authored by Prof Paul Hodges is to present current understanding of the interaction between movement and pain; as a cause or effect of pain, and in terms of the role of movement (physical activity and exercise) in recovery of pain and restoration of function.

3

CEUs

400.00

Health Care Professional’s Patient relationship: Part 1

Health Care Professional’s Patient relationship: Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Melissa Botha, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein 

Good value for my practice.  Dr Dian Petrus Van der Westhuizen, General Practitioner, Kimberley 

Excellent value for my practice.  Sara du Plooy, Physiotherapist, Ventersburg 

Good value for my practice.  Surene Janse van Vuuren, Biokineticist, Brakpan

Good value for my practice.  Tshepo Bokaba-Rammele, Physiotherapist, Hammanskraal


The health care profession-patient relationship is the cornerstone of medical practice and therefore of medical ethics. 

This on-line course will discuss:

  • Respect and equal treatment
  • Ending a patient-HP relationship
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Sexual attraction
  • Treating family members
  • Communication & consent, case study #1 included
  • Obstacles for good communication plus case study #2   
  • Abusing medical resources including case study #3
  • Futile treatment

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

Principles of Injury Prevention:  Part 4:  Training Methods, Envelope of Function, Central Governor Model

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 4: Training Methods, Envelope of Function, Central Governor Model

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


The science of sports injury prevention has grown exponentially over the past two decades. We know that interventions can prevent major knee, ankle and other injuries. This course will help you to help your sports clients to reduce the risk of injury. You will gain a thorough understanding of how sports injuries occur. Then you will gain in-depth knowledge of the factors that can reduce the risk of injury – warm-up, stretching, taping and bracing, equipment, surfaces, training, envelope of function and the central governor model for the limit of performance and their appropriate use.

3

CEUs

400.00

Paediatric Neurology:  Part 1 - The Paediatric Neurological Examination

Paediatric Neurology: Part 1 - The Paediatric Neurological Examination

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle van Dyk, Physiotherapist, Centurion

Excellent value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

The first 5 years of life are the most vital when considering the development of a child’s nervous system. In part one of this course, you will be provided with all tools necessary to complete a detailed history and examination of your young patients and an explanation of how these assessments relate to development later in life. 

After completing the three-part course, you will have gained significant knowledge to make you more confident when dealing with complicated paediatric cases.

This course is essential for anyone wanting to be an expert in the field of paediatrics.

3

CEUs

400.00

The Best Stretching Exercise

The Best Stretching Exercise

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Simon Velskoen, State Employed Physiotherapist, Mahikeng

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


Loss of range of movement (ROM) is a common outcome following injuries. The problem is that traditional stretching methods are often ineffective in improving ROM, let alone reducing pain and disability in various conditions -particularly where multi structure impairment is present.

SO, WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Kinesiologist Aaron Mattes has developed a solution to deal with the problem.

It’s called AIS and it’s a lot more than a stretching method.

This course will show you how to use AIS and its three evidence-based pain relieving modalities. AIS will increase your patients’ tolerance to pain while stretching and so improve their ROM.


3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Health Care Professional’s Patient relationship:  Part 2

Health Care Professional’s Patient relationship: Part 2

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

Excellent value for my practice.  Tshepo Bokaba -Rammele, Physiotherapist, Hammanskraal


After working through this course, you should be able to:

  • explain how medical decisions should be made for patients who are incapable of making their own decisions;
  • explain the justification for patient confidentiality and recognise legitimate exceptions;
  • recognise the principle ethical issues surrounding the beginning and end of life;
  • summarise the arguments for and against the practice of euthanasia/assisted suicide; and the difference between these actions and palliative care or foregoing treatment.

3 Ethics

CEUs

400.00

Update on Rehabilitation following ACL Reconstruction:  Part 1

Update on Rehabilitation following ACL Reconstruction: Part 1

Testimonials: 

Excellent course material, article and MCQ test. Highly recommended for home study and self-development.  Excellent value for my practice.  Dustin Du Toit, Biokineticist, Kimberley

Excellent value for my practice.  Portia Thandeka Khoza, Physiotherapist, Krugersdorp 

For my practice and confidence to explore more - this course is of great value. The ability to do courses this way to add to one`s CPD -points is great value. Thank you so much!  Excellent value for my practice.  Rene Bredenkamp, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Jonathan Fingleson, Physiotherapist, Riviera Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Patricia Schmidt, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

I highly recommend the online courses because  the reading of articles can be done at your own pace and in the comfort of my home.  Excellent value for my practice.  Suraya Pahad, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

As anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has evolved to less invasive, more anatomical approaches, rehabilitation of the injured athlete has become more progressive and innovative.

This correspondence course will help you become familiar with these innovations, looking at everything from planning rehabilitation timetables to re-establishing the athlete’s confidence and self-efficacy; and preparing patients for return to play – which is, after all, what we all want to achieve.

3

CEUs

400.00

Paediatric Neurology:  Part 2 - Common Neurological Disorders in Children 1

Paediatric Neurology: Part 2 - Common Neurological Disorders in Children 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ursula Thormeyer, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle van Dyk, Physiotherapist, Centurion

 

Part 2 focuses on common pathologies affecting children. You will learn about the  different types of headaches (from migraines to headaches caused by pathology/trauma) that affect young children, how they present and how you can help.   Part 2 also covers neurocutaneous syndromes like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis and Sturge-Weber syndrome, Myasthenia gravis and spinal cord injury. 

After completing the three-part course, you will have gained significant knowledge to make you more confident when dealing with complicated paediatric cases.

This course is essential for anyone wanting to be an expert in the field of paediatrics.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00