Loading

Body Region



NEW - A Fundamental Critique of the Fascial Distortion Model and its Application in Clinical Practice

NEW - A Fundamental Critique of the Fascial Distortion Model and its Application in Clinical Practice

The therapeutic techniques used in the fascial distortion model (FDM) and other fascial release techniques have become increasingly popular among physiotherapists. Based on the absence of proof of concept for FDM treatment techniques along with certain theoretical considerations, seven problems emerge and are discussed in this on-line course. The most striking of these include: (1) diagnostic criteria for FDM, (2) the biological implausibility of the model, (3) the reduction of all such disorders to a single common denominator: the fasciae, (4) the role of FDM research, and (5) potentially harmful consequences related to FDM treatment.

3

CEUs

400.00

Fascial Plasticity - A New Neurobiological Explanation

Fascial Plasticity - A New Neurobiological Explanation

In myofascial manipulation an immediate tissue release is often felt under the working hand. This amazing feature has traditionally been attributed to mechanical properties of the connective tissue. But is that all it is? What is required to permanent viscoelastic deformation of fascia. Should we not be moving away from a purely mechanical perspective toward a more inclusive, broader approach?

This course introduces some of the latest thinking in this arena.

3

CEUs

400.00

Treating Patellar Tendinopathy with Fascial Manipulation

Treating Patellar Tendinopathy with Fascial Manipulation

What causes patellar tendon pain? Is treating the patellar tendon the most effective means of treatment?

This course examines the response of 18 patients suffering from patellar tendon pain to a technique previously not used for this complaint. The results were impressive: a substantial decrease in pain immediately after treatment which remained unchanged or improved in the short term.

3

CEUs

400.00

Fascia: Surgery and scarring

Fascia: Surgery and scarring

Although all wounds pass through the same mechanism of repair towards full recovery, the final cosmetic and functional result may differ markedly. As a physiotherapist, is there anything you can do to make a difference to the healing process and the restoration of tissue integrity?

This course will provide some answers.

3

CEUs

400.00

The Fascia of the Limbs and Back - Part 1

The Fascia of the Limbs and Back - Part 1

Fascia have long interested clinicians in a multitude of different clinical and paramedical disciplines and with good reason. This article, which provides an anatomical perspective that extends from the gross to the molecular level, deals with fascia in the limbs and back, with particular focus on deep fascia.

Among the many functions of fascia considered in detail are its ectoskeletal role (as a soft tissue skeleton for muscle attachments), its importance for creating osteofascial compartments for muscles, encouraging venous return in the lower limb, dissipating stress concentration at enthesis and acting as a protective sheet for underlying structures.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

3

CEUs

400.00

The Fascia of the Limbs and Back - Part 2

The Fascia of the Limbs and Back - Part 2

Fascia have long interested clinicians in a multitude of different clinical and paramedical disciplines and with good reason. This article, which provides an anatomical perspective that extends from the gross to the molecular level, deals with fascia in the limbs and back, with particular focus on deep fascia.

Among the many functions of fascia considered in detail are its ectoskeletal role (as a soft tissue skeleton for muscle attachments), its importance for creating osteofascial compartments for muscles, encouraging venous return in the lower limb, dissipating stress concentration at enthesis and acting as a protective sheet for underlying structures.

3

CEUs

400.00

Fascial Anatomy in Manual Therapy: Introducing New Biomechanical Model.

Fascial Anatomy in Manual Therapy: Introducing New Biomechanical Model.

Fascial anatomy studies influence our understanding of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. However, evidenced-based models for manual therapists working with movement dysfunction and pain are still developing. This review presents a synthesis of one biomechanical model and discusses underlying hypotheses in reference to some current trends in musculoskeletal research.


This information could introduce new perspectives to clinicians involved in the manual treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions.

3

CEUs

400.00

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessie Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Ine Terblanche, Physiotherapist, Vanderbijlpark

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Chante du Preez, Physiotherapist, Kempton Park

Excellent value for my practice.  Johann Wessels, Physiotherapist, East London

Good value for my practice.  Lara Brookstein, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

Running is a hugely popular activity – but many runners overdo it, suffer injuries as a result, and then turn to us as clinicians to sort them out – as quickly as possible. 

This course will help you learn about the common risk factors for running overuse and how to prevent them. 

Also described are the most common running-related injuries including patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes and their biomechanics and prevention.

3

CEUs

400.00

Examination of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 1

Examination of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Alicia Ras, Physiotherapist, Pretoria 

Excellent value for my practice.  Ziyad Vally Vally, Massage Therapist, Johannesburg

This course will concentrate on examination of the TMJ and also briefly cover examination of other structures for dysfunction related to the TMJ. Examination is discussed under two main sections:

Subjective examination, in which patients are questioned about their symptoms, how they interfere with daily activities and the history of the symptoms; Objective examination, the physical examination of musculoskeletal structures.

Examination of the TMJ should include the examination of dental occlusion, masticatory muscles, suprahyoid muscles, the upper cervical spine and the cervical musculature, as all these structures are functionally interdependent.

The functional interdependence of the TMJs with dental occlusion and with the upper cervical spine is outlined. Due to this interdependence and to overlapping presentation of pain referral from the TMJs and from the upper cervical spine, it is essential that the clinician examine in details these structures as possible sources of symptoms in patients with facial pain and headache.

 



3

CEUs

400.00

Examination of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 2

Examination of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 2

This course will concentrate on examination of the TMJ and also briefly cover examination of other structures for dysfunction related to the TMJ. Examination is discussed under two main sections:


Subjective examination, in which patients are questioned about their symptoms, how they interfere with daily activities and the history of the symptoms; Objective examination, the physical examination of musculoskeletal structures.


Examination of the TMJ should include the examination of dental occlusion, masticatory muscles, suprahyoid muscles, the upper cervical spine and the cervical musculature, as all these structures are functionally interdependent.


The functional interdependence of the TMJs with dental occlusion and with the upper cervical spine is outlined. Due to this interdependence and to overlapping presentation of pain referral from the TMJs and from the upper cervical spine, it is essential that the clinician examine in details these structures as possible sources of symptoms in patients with facial pain and headache.

3

CEUs

400.00

Treatment of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 1

Treatment of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 1

The management of the common clinical syndromes presented in this course are:
1. Myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) syndrome
2. Post-fracture of the mandible and/or maxilla
3. Post-extraction of wisdom teeth
4. TMJ osteoarthritis
5. TMJ clicking
6. Pain secondary to new or remodelled dentures
7. TMJ locking
8. Headache, earache, facial pain.


Presentation of these clinical symptoms will serve to emphasise that in many cases, the symptoms are multifactorial in aetiology and may require diagnostic and treatment skills of dentists, doctors and physiotherapists. This multidisciplinary approach has been found to offer solutions to complex problems

3

CEUs

400.00

Treatment of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 2

Treatment of the Temporomandibular Joint - Part 2

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Dr Balbina Briles, Chiropractor, Cape Town 

 

The management of the common clinical syndromes presented in this course are:

1. Myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) syndrome
2. Post-fracture of the mandible and/or maxilla
3. Post-extraction of wisdom teeth
4. TMJ osteoarthritis
5. TMJ clicking
6. Pain secondary to new or remodelled dentures
7. TMJ locking
8. Headache, earache, facial pain.

Presentation of these clinical symptoms will serve to emphasise that in many cases, the symptoms are multifactorial in aetiology and may require diagnostic and treatment skills of dentists, doctors and physiotherapists. This multidisciplinary approach has been found to offer solutions to complex problems.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Patellofemoral Pain:  Clinical Practice Guidelines - Summary of Recommendations

NEW - Patellofemoral Pain: Clinical Practice Guidelines - Summary of Recommendations

Aim of the Guidelines

The Academy of Orthopaedic Physical Therapy of the Ameri­can Physical Therapy Association, Inc has an ongo­ing effort to create evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of pa­tients with musculoskeletal impairments.

The objectives of this clinical guidelines are as follows: 

  • Describe evidence-based physical therapy practice, includ­ing diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, and assessment of outcome, for musculoskeletal disorders commonly man­aged by orthopaedic physical therapists 

  • Identify interventions supported by current best evidence to address impairments of body function and structure, activity limitations, and participation restrictions associated with common musculoskeletal conditions

3

CEUs

400.00

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population: Part 1 - Assessment

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population: Part 1 - Assessment

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Hlulani Oefen Nkuna, Physiotherapist, Louis Trichardt 

Good value for my practice.  Jessica Neuhoff, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Barend Steyn, Biokineticist, Potchefstroom

Good value for my practice.  Lara Brookstein, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


Increase your success rate in treating patients with anterior knee pain.

AKP can be one of the most difficult conditions to manage. The success rate of most treatment regimens has been poor and the condition frequently recurs. 

This three-part, online course will equip you with the latest tools to deal effectively with this and other related sports injuries.

You’ll learn about assessing the knee in part one; part two will introduce you to the new integrated treatment approach; and part three deals with patellar tendinopathy.

3

CEUs

400.00

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population - Part 2:Integrated Treatment

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population - Part 2:Integrated Treatment

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Barend Steyn,Biokineticist, Potchefstroom 

Good value for my practice.  Lara Brookstein, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

Increase your success rate in treating patients with anterior knee pain.

AKP can be one of the most difficult conditions to manage. The success rate of most treatment regimens has been poor and the condition frequently recurs.

This three-part, online course will equip you with the latest tools to deal effectively with this and other related sports injuries.

You’ll learn about assessing the knee in part one; part two will introduce you to the new integrated treatment approach; and part three deals with patellar tendinopathy.

3

CEUs

400.00

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population - Part 3: Patellar Tendinopathy

Anterior Knee Pain in the Sporting Population - Part 3: Patellar Tendinopathy

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Karese Govender, Physiotherapist

 

Increase your success rate in treating patients with anterior knee pain.

AKP can be one of the most difficult conditions to manage. The success rate of most treatment regimens has been poor and the condition frequently recurs.

This three-part, online course will equip you with the latest tools to deal effectively with this and other related sports injuries.

You’ll learn about assessing the knee in part one; part two will introduce you to the new integrated treatment approach; and part three deals with patellar tendinopathy.


3

CEUs

400.00

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 1

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 1

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Johanna van Niekerk, Physiotherpist, Nelspruit

 

Treatment of Patellofemoral pain is changing. In the past, interventions have typically focused on the joint itself. But is that enough? Aren’t there possibly other factors at play –and if so, what approach should be taken to treat it?

This two part on-line course provides:

  • fresh insight into the mechanics that may influence the patellofemoral joint; and
  • provides treatment options that bring long-term success.

3

CEUs

400.00

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 2

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 2

Treatment of Patellofemoral pain is changing. In the past, interventions have typically focused on the joint itself. But is that enough? Aren’t there possibly other factors at play –and if so, what approach should be taken to treat it?

This two part on-line course provides:
fresh insight into the mechanics that may influence the patellofemoral joint; and
provides treatment options that bring long-term success.

3

CEUs

400.00

Selection of Taping Techniques for Knee Pain

Selection of Taping Techniques for Knee Pain

This on-line course offers practical tips for the selection of taping techniques for knee pain. You will learn which techniques to utilise for severe, moderate and mild knee pain as well as for different pathologies.


In addition, there are tips for taping sporting and non-sporting persons.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Current Concepts in Tendon Rehabilitation

NEW - Current Concepts in Tendon Rehabilitation

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ivette Louwrens, Physiotherapist, Mbombela

 

Tendinopathy can be very difficult to treat with multiple management strategies and theories suggested. At present, the strongest evidence supports the use of exercise as a management strategy, with tendon loading the only intervention that can change the strength and mechanical properties of a tendon. A 4-stage exercise-based tendon rehabilitation programme has been proposed as an effective progressive loading intervention to manage tendinopathy. In this course, clinical specialist, Jill Cook discusses current concepts in tendon rehabilitation.  

3

CEUs

Hip Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 1 - Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics

Hip Pain in the Sports Person: Part 1 - Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Candice Hall, Biokineticist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Elmarie Van Coller, Physiotherapist, Wellington

Good value for my practice.  Mandy Banks, Biokineticist, Cape Town


Until recently, the hip joint was not thought to be a significant cause of problems in the athletic population. Now, thanks to MRI, and hip arthroscopy we have been able to learn more about some of the common underlying causes of groin pain. These will be covered in part one and two of this course.

Part 3 covers the clinical assessment and treatment of labral tears, ligamentum teres tears, synovitis, chondropathy, surgical management, os acetabulare and lateral hip pain.

This on-line course includes ample photos of exercises for hip rehabilitation.



3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain and the Athlete: Suggestion for Management

NEW - Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain and the Athlete: Suggestion for Management

Testimonial: 

Good value for my practice.  Hasmita Mithal, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

 

Highly recommended.

This on-line teaching module defines the term rotator cuff related shoulder pain and its possible causes, treatment approach, and risk factors.

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy, according to Lewis "refers to pain and weakness, most commonly experienced with movements of shoulder external rotation and elevation, as a consequence of excessive load on the rotator cuff tissues". The patho-etiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy is multifactorial and can be attributed to extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, as well as to environmental factors. Rotator cuff tendinopathy is not a homogenous entity because of the diverse nature of the factors involved and hence, different treatment interventions are required, which take these specific mechanisms/factors into account.

3

CEUs

NEW - Shoulder Instability in Athletes: Non-Operative Management

NEW - Shoulder Instability in Athletes: Non-Operative Management

Highly recommended. 


This on-line teaching course focuses on the challenges of non-operative treatment for shoulder instability.

The term ‘shoulder instability’ is used to refer to the inability to maintain the humeral head in the glenoid fossa. The ligamentous and muscle structures around the glenohumeral joint, under non-pathological conditions, create a balanced net joint reaction force. 

If the integrity of any of these structures is disrupted it can lead to atraumatic or traumatic instability. Atraumatic instability commonly results from repetitive overhead movements or congenital joint features. Traumatic mechanisms of injury may result in frank dislocations where there is a loss of joint integrity. Instability can occur anteriorly, posteriorly, or in multiple directions regardless of the mechanism of injury. 


3

CEUs

NEW - Current Concepts in Shoulder Rehabilitation

NEW - Current Concepts in Shoulder Rehabilitation

Highly recommended.

This on-line teaching will discuss the challenges in shoulder rehabilitation:

  1. Exercise is as effective as surgery for subacrial pain syndrome (impingement) and for atraumatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. 
  2. Structural diagnosis is usually not possible and there is a very poor correlation between imaging findings and symptoms.
  3. Symptom modification may be the best way to overcome this impasse.
  4. Exercise is the most important component of the management of shoulder pain but a marginal gain theory should also be considered.

 

3

CEUs

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy/Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Is it Time for a New Method of Assessment?

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy/Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Is it Time for a New Method of Assessment?

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Jessie  Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


Diagnosing rotator cuff tendinopathy or subacromial impingement syndrome currently involves performing a structured assessment that includes taking the patient’s history in conjunction with performing clinical assessment procedures that generally involve tests used to implicate an isolated structure. Based on the response to the clinical tests, a diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy or subacromial impingement syndrome is achieved. 

This process eventually results in the formation of a clinical hypothesis, and then, in conjunction with the patient, a management plan is decided upon and implemented.

This online course focuses on the dilemmas associated with the current process, and an alternative method for the clinical examination of the shoulder for this group of patients is proposed.


3

CEUs

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 1

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person: Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Dr. Sholini Sookraj, Chiropractor, Durban 

A great overview of various categories of shoulder injuries and how to assess a shoulder injury. Useful to my practice.  Good value for my practice.  Daniella Fernandes, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

 

In recent years, there have been many advances in the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain. Part one of these on-line courses reviews:

  • the functional anatomy of the shoulder complex;
  • the key features of the clinical history;
  • how to conduct a swift and effective physical examination;
  • investigations;
  • treatment of important shoulder conditions; and
  • the prescription for practical shoulder rehabilitation.

Part 2 focuses on mechanism of injury, assessment and rehabilitation of the rotator cuff.

3

CEUs

400.00

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 2

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Hugo Johanni, Biokineticist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Daniella Fernandes, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

 

In recent years, there have been many advances in the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain. Part one of these on-line courses reviews:

  • the functional anatomy of the shoulder complex;
  • the key features of the clinical history;
  • how to conduct a swift and effective physical examination;
  • investigations;
  • treatment of important shoulder conditions; and
  • the prescription for practical shoulder rehabilitation.

Part 2 focuses on mechanism of injury, assessment and rehabilitation of the rotator cuff.

3

CEUs

400.00

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation - Part 1

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation - Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Kate-lyn Vos, Biokineticist, Meyersdal 

Good value for my practice.  Stephan Terblanche, Biokineticist, Durban

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


These courses are based on the physiology and biomechanics of the shoulder. They provide very effective rehabilitation protocols in terms of return to play. They will assist you to diagnose not only local anatomical lesions, such as rotator cuff tear or Bankart lesion, but also the biomechanical deficits that exist in the shoulder girdle and spine. 

But that’s not all. Distant disorders such as inflexibilities of hip rotation, short hamstrings, or the stiff back also often contribute to shoulder abnormalities. The course will enable you to make a complete diagnosis and to look beyond the injured tissues to tissues that may be overloaded. 

You will also learn to detect functional biomechanical deficits as well as the subclinical adaptations that sports people use to try to maintain performance.

3

CEUs

400.00

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation:  Part 2

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Stephan Terblanche, Biokineticist, Durban 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Megan Goldblatt,  Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

These courses are based on the physiology and biomechanics of the shoulder. They provide very effective rehabilitation protocols in terms of return to play. They will assist you to diagnose not only local anatomical lesions, such as rotator cuff tear or Bankart lesion, but also the biomechanical deficits that exist in the shoulder girdle and spine.

But that’s not all. Distant disorders such as inflexibilities of hip rotation, short hamstrings, or the stiff back also often contribute to shoulder abnormalities. The course will enable you to make a complete diagnosis and to look beyond the injured tissues to tissues that may be overloaded.

You will also learn to detect functional biomechanical deficits as well as the subclinical adaptations that sports people use to try to maintain performance.

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Upper Quarter: Upper Trapezius, Scalenus & SCM

Muscle Energy Techniques: Upper Quarter: Upper Trapezius, Scalenus & SCM

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following tight upper quarter muscles:


Part 1:
Pectoralis major
Latissimus dorsi
Upper trapezius
Scalenes
Sternocleidomastoid

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Upper Quarter: Levator Scapula, Infra & Supra Spinatus & Subscapularis

Muscle Energy Techniques: Upper Quarter: Levator Scapula, Infra & Supra Spinatus & Subscapularis

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following tight upper quarter muscles:

Part 2:
Levator scapulae
Infraspinatus
Subscapularis
Supraspinatus
Flexors of the arm
Flexors of the forearm
Biceps brachii

3

CEUs

400.00

Diagnostic Ultrasound of the Shoulder — A method for experts only?

Diagnostic Ultrasound of the Shoulder — A method for experts only?

Only practitioners with significant clinical experience in diagnostic ultrasound examination should attempt to use the technology to diagnose something as complex as tears of the rotator cuff or for pathology in the long head of the biceps muscle.  Right?

This on-line course offers some answers as it examines the outcome achieved by an orthopaedic surgeon with little experience in ultrasound.

The conclusions of this course may surprise you. And help you to put your own ambitions to possibly broaden your own diagnostic horizons into perspective.  


3

CEUs

400.00

Integrated Approach for Peripheral Joints - Part 1

Integrated Approach for Peripheral Joints - Part 1

What is manual therapy? How is it combined with active movement? What is the effect of this?
Find out how to apply this technique and learn about how to use it as an assessment tool for peripheral joints.

3

CEUs

400.00

Integrated Approach for Peripheral Joints - Part 2

Integrated Approach for Peripheral Joints - Part 2

What is manual therapy? How is it combined with active movement? What is the effect of this?
Find out how to apply this technique and learn about how to use it as an assessment tool for peripheral joints.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Treating Low Back Pain - Bridging the Gap between Manual Therapy and Exercise

NEW - Treating Low Back Pain - Bridging the Gap between Manual Therapy and Exercise

Testimonials:  

Excellent value for my practice.  Jo-ane Paulsen, Physiotherapist, George

Excellent value for my practice.  Dwayne Phillips, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Heather Auditore, Physiotherapist, Groot Jongensfontein

Good value for my practice.  Ashwin Jacobs, State Employed Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth 

Good value for my practice.  Anri Matthee, Community Service Physiotherapist, Vredenburg 

Excellent value for my practice.   Rushay Arendse, State Employed Physiotherapist, Uitenhage 

Excellent value for my practice.  Amore Barry, Physiotherapist, Calitzdorp 

Good value for my practice.  Patrizia Van Zyl, Physiotherapist, Ashton 

Excellent value for my practice.  Carin McDonald, Physiotherapist, George 

Good value for my practice.  Kerry-Leigh Fargher, Biokineticist, Grahamstown 

Good value for my practice.  Nicola Brown, Physiotherapist, Grahamstown


As therapists, we often recommend exercise to reduce patients’ low-back pain, as well as increase their active range of motion and muscle strength. However, physical therapists face a challenge when recommending exercise to reduce low-back pain because the pain itself often inhibits the patient’s ability to exercise or perform activities of daily living. This situation becomes even more challenging if the prescribed exercise progam aggravates the individual’s low-back pain.   

This article discusses a method which provides for the effective treatment of low back pain by allowing patients to exercise pain free earlier in the rehabilitation process.  The method comprises a unique approach utilizing the following four components simultaneously from the onset of treatment: isometric muscle contraction (IMC); assisted active oscillatory mobilization; end-of-range passive stretch; and mindfulness.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Treating Low Back Pain – Movement Therapy Approach

NEW - Treating Low Back Pain – Movement Therapy Approach

Testimonials: 

Excellent value for my practice.  Lorianne Evans, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Kerry-Leigh Fargher, Biokineticist, Grahamstown


As therapists, we often recommend exercise to reduce patients’ low-back pain, as well as increase their active range of motion and muscle strength. However, physical therapists face a challenge when recommending exercise to reduce low-back pain because the pain itself often inhibits the patient’s ability to exercise or perform activities of daily living. This situation becomes even more challenging if the prescribed exercise progam aggravates the individual’s low-back pain.  

This article discusses a method which provides for the effective treatment of low back pain by allowing patients to exercise pain free earlier in the rehabilitation process.  The method comprises a unique approach utilizing the following four components simultaneously from the onset of treatment: isometric muscle contraction (IMC); assisted active oscillatory movement; end-of-range passive stretch; and mindfulness.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain:  Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 1

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain: Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 1

Many clinical practice guidelines recommend similar approaches for the assessment and management of low back pain. Recommendations include use of a biopsychosocial framework to guide management with initial nonpharmacological treatment, including education that supports self-management and resumption of normal activities and exercise, and psychological programmes for those with persistent symptoms. 

However, globally, gaps between evidence and practice exist, with limited use of recommended first-line treatments and inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery. The advances with the greatest potential are arguably those that align practice with the evidence, reduce the focus on spinal abnormalities, and ensure promotion of activity and function, including work participation. 

We have identified effective, promising, or emerging solutions that could offer new directions.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain:  Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 2

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain: Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 2

Many clinical practice guidelines recommend similar approaches for the assessment and management of low back pain. Recommendations include use of a biopsychosocial framework to guide management with initial nonpharmacological treatment, including education that supports self-management and resumption of normal activities and exercise, and psychological programmes for those with persistent symptoms. 

However, globally, gaps between evidence and practice exist, with limited use of recommended first-line treatments and inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery. The advances with the greatest potential are arguably those that align practice with the evidence, reduce the focus on spinal abnormalities, and ensure promotion of activity and function, including work participation. 

We have identified effective, promising, or emerging solutions that could offer new directions.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain:  Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 3

NEW - Prevention and Treatment of Low Back Pain: Evidence, Challenges and Promising Directions - Part 3

Many clinical practice guidelines recommend similar approaches for the assessment and management of low back pain. Recommendations include use of a biopsychosocial framework to guide management with initial nonpharmacological treatment, including education that supports self-management and resumption of normal activities and exercise, and psychological programmes for those with persistent symptoms. 

However, globally, gaps between evidence and practice exist, with limited use of recommended first-line treatments and inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery. The advances with the greatest potential are arguably those that align practice with the evidence, reduce the focus on spinal abnormalities, and ensure promotion of activity and function, including work participation. 

We have identified effective, promising, or emerging solutions that could offer new directions.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

NEW - All you ever wanted to know about back pain

NEW - All you ever wanted to know about back pain

Testimonials:

"This article has changed the way which I see low back pain as a therapist, it has given more insight into how to approach low back pain.  Also enlightened the things to take into consideration as one begin with subjective assessment and also how to explain or make a patient to understand low back pain."  Lisa Shongwe, Physiotherapist, Nelspruit 

"I realized that some of the advice we give our patients often put them more into a psychological fear of pain."  Dwayne Phillips, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Johanna Pretorius, Physiotherapist, George

Excellent value for my practice.  Carina van der Watt, Physiotherapist, Mosselbay 

Excellent value for my practice.  Heather Auditore, Physiotherapist, Groot Jongensfontein 

Excellent value for my practice.  Carin McDonald, Physiotherapist, George

Excellent value for my practice.  Amy Smythe, Physiotherapist, Ladysmith 

Excellent value for my practice.  Gareth Oliver, Physiotherapist, Benoni 

Excellent value for my practice.  Lenaka Simon Kekana, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

Good value for my practice.  Thea Smith, Physiotherapist, Oudtshoorn 

Good value for my practice.  Lizette lutz, Physiotherapist, Swellendam 

Good value for my practice.  Jo-ane Paulsen, Physiotherapist, George 

Good value for my practice.  Wilma Stevens, Physiotherapist, Oudtshoorn 

Good value for my practice.  Noelle van Schalkwyk, Physiotherapist, Hartenbos 

Good value for my practice.  Amore Barry, Physiotherapist, Calitzdorp


Both misunderstood and mismanaged, low back pain is a huge source of suffering for many people worldwide. Here’s the up-to-date knowledge on the condition and some advice on the steps people can take to help themselves. Low back pain is common and recurrent, but rarely serious.

3

CEUs

400.00

Treating Low Back Pain  - A Multimodal Treatment Approach

Treating Low Back Pain - A Multimodal Treatment Approach

We all know that exercise is good for us. As therapists, we often use exercise to reduce patients’ acute and chronic pain.

But what if your patients can’t exercise or function because pain inhibits their movement? How often do your patients just want to give up on their exercise programme because of this? And how frustrating is it for you not to be able to use your skills as a physiotherapist to the fullest extent possible?

This online course describes a multi-modal treatment approach: an evidence-based approach for managing neuromusculoskeletal disorders with special reference to low back pain sufferers. The approach utilizes therapeutic pain science education, manual therapy (including dynamic oscillatory physiological movements), passive accessory mobilization, and exercise therapy. This online course draws on a powerful combination of clinical expertise and unique techniques which provide effective treatment for back pain.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 1

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 1

Here’s a method that’s been proved to assist millions of people worldwide to reduce and eliminate musculoskeletal disorders - empowering patients to take control of their own symptoms and management, getting them pain free as quickly and cost effectively as possible.

It can also establish a patient’s directional preference and determine movements likely to help abolish the pain and restore function.

This three-part course, which must be taken together, is a must for any professional who treats back and neck pain.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 2

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 2

Here’s a method that’s been proved to assist millions of people worldwide to reduce and eliminate musculoskeletal disorders - empowering patients to take control of their own symptoms and management, getting them pain free as quickly and cost effectively as possible.

It can also establish a patient’s directional preference and determine movements likely to help abolish the pain and restore function.

This three-part course, which must be taken together, is a must for any professional who treats back and neck pain.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 3

Management of Mechanical Low Back Pain. A Comprehensive Approach: Part 3

Here’s a method that’s been proved to assist millions of people worldwide to reduce and eliminate musculoskeletal disorders - empowering patients to take control of their own symptoms and management, getting them pain free as quickly and cost effectively as possible.

It can also establish a patient’s directional preference and determine movements likely to help abolish the pain and restore function.

This three-part course, which must be taken together, is a must for any professional who treats back and neck pain.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Physical Examination of the Lumbar Spine - Part 1

Physical Examination of the Lumbar Spine - Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Amy Smythe, Physiotherapist, Ladysmith 

Good value for my practice.  Kristen Meagan Nicholson, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


Because low back pain can involve a multitude of factors, how you examine your LBP patients is critical. 

In part 1 of this course, we look at the factors that warrant consideration for their possible presence and role in a patient’s low back disorder.We also pay attention to non-musculoskeletal pathology, mechanical factors, ageing and degeneration, structural anomalies and muscle dysfunction. 

Part 2 covers the objective examination of the lumbar spine and includes observation, interpretation and analysis of active movements, neurological testing, tension tests, manual segmental examination, muscular examination and the interpretation of the conclusion of the examination.


3

CEUs

400.00

Physical Examination of the Lumbar Spine - Part 2

Physical Examination of the Lumbar Spine - Part 2

Because low back pain can involve a multitude of factors, how you examine your LBP patients is critical.

In part 1 of this course, we look at the factors that warrant consideration for their possible presence and role in a patient’s low back disorder.We also pay attention to non-musculoskeletal pathology, mechanical factors, ageing and degeneration, structural anomalies and muscle dysfunction.

Part 2 covers the objective examination of the lumbar spine and includes observation, interpretation and analysis of active movements, neurological testing, tension tests, manual segmental examination, muscular examination and the interpretation of the conclusion of the examination.

3

CEUs

400.00

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation for Vertebral Conditions - Part 1

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation for Vertebral Conditions - Part 1

What role does the muscular system play in the control of activity throughout the body? What are the several causes for abnormal afferent input from the spine? What is the theory behind PNF?

Part 1 of this course provides the theoretical background to PNF. When discussing the use of PNF techniques for the treatment of patients with vertebral disorders, it is wise to consider the abnormal. Part 1 of this course will provide you with everything you need to know about PNF, including muscle physiology and function; neurophysiology and neuropathology of the neuromusculoskeletal system; and the effect of pain on muscle activity. It also provides a review of PNF techniques and their applications.

Part 2 helps you put what you have learned in part one into practice. It is fully illustrated with most of the PNF techniques for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine as well as peripheral joints. All figures contain detailed explanations for the use of each technique. It also covers the effect pain has on muscle activity and how PNF techniques address this problem.

3

CEUs

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation for Vertebral Conditions - Part 2

Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation for Vertebral Conditions - Part 2

What role does the muscular system play in the control of activity throughout the body? What are the several causes for abnormal afferent input from the spine? What is the theory behind PNF?

Part 1 of this course provides the theoretical background to PNF. When discussing the use of PNF techniques for the treatment of patients with vertebral disorders, it is wise to consider the abnormal. Part 1 of this course will provide you with everything you need to know about PNF, including muscle physiology and function; neurophysiology and neuropathology of the neuromusculoskeletal system; and the effect of pain on muscle activity. It also provides a review of PNF techniques and their applications.

Part 2 helps you put what you have learned in part one into practice. It is fully illustrated with most of the PNF techniques for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine as well as peripheral joints. All figures contain detailed explanations for the use of each technique. It also covers the effect pain has on muscle activity and how PNF techniques address this problem.

3

CEUs

The Sacro-Iliac Joint - Part 1

The Sacro-Iliac Joint - Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Candice Hall, Biokineticist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Nadia Ferreira, Physiotherapist, Mtunzini


We all know that physical factors impact joint motion. But what factors influence the actual mechanics of the joint? Are they purely “mechanical”, or could something else be at play?

This course briefly outlines the assessment findings and the principles for management of the various factors that impact function of the SIJ. It also provides a comprehensive methodology for the effective management of pelvic pain and dysfunction.



3

CEUs

400.00

The Sacro-Iliac Joint - Part 2

The Sacro-Iliac Joint - Part 2

We all know that physical factors impact joint motion. But what factors influence the actual mechanics of the joint? Are they purely “mechanical”, or could something else be at play?


This course briefly outlines the assessment findings and the principles for management of the various factors that impact function of the SIJ. It also provides a comprehensive methodology for the effective management of pelvic pain and dysfunction

3

CEUs

400.00

Low Back Related-Leg Pain

Low Back Related-Leg Pain

Low back pain and leg pain, like love and marriage, usually go together like a horse and carriage. The key for the practitioner is to differentiate between the two in order to make an appropriate diagnosis and identify the underlying pathology.


This course introduces a systematic approach to assist with the diagnosis and classification of LBP patients in order to provide a more effective, appropriate treatment.

3

CEUs

400.00

Taping for Pain Relief of Spinal Conditions

Taping for Pain Relief of Spinal Conditions

Low back pain can be difficult to treat. Management of chronic low back pain and leg pain requires a multifactorial approach. This course will not only help you to identify the underlying causative factors of LBP, but will also provide you with techniques that will enable you to assist patients to increase their active control of the passively unstable and associated areas in a way that will minimise symptom reoccurrences. Add an important modality to your tool box.

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

3

CEUs

400.00

Abdominal Pain of Musculoskeletal Region

Abdominal Pain of Musculoskeletal Region

There is substantial evidence in the literature that the musculoskeletal system is capable of producing abdominal symptoms. Most authors agree that the vast majority of cases of abdominal pain have a visceral origin and, in the first instance, visceral pathology which must be excluded. However, when routine visceral screening investigations are negative, clinicians should consider the musculoskeletal system as a potential cause of symptoms. 


The viscera are known for their capacity to present misleading symptoms and have been described as the ‘great deceivers’ in terms of the patterns of pain presentation.


Correct interpretation of the symptoms through a careful history and physical examination is important for an accurate diagnosis and treatment.  Given the incidence of patients with abdominal pain that remains unexplained following gastroenterological investigations, it is vital to investigate the musculoskeletal system and, where appropriate, treat accordingly.

 


3

CEUs

400.00

Examination of the Thoracic Spine

Examination of the Thoracic Spine

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Daniella Fernandes, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


This is a comprehensive 15-page manual which includes nine figures of practical demonstration on examination and treatment techniques.

The examination of any patient suffering with symptoms of neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction consists of two main parts:  

  • a questioning/interview section, including inquiry about both the symptoms present and their history; and
  • a physical examination section, in which the structures implicated during the interview are examined.  

Both aspects of the evaluation are of equal importance in establishing a differential neuromusculoskeletal diagnosis.

3

CEUs

400.00

Rehabilitation of Some Thoracic Syndromes – Part 1

Rehabilitation of Some Thoracic Syndromes – Part 1

Successful management of any thoracic syndrome is contingent upon the therapist’s ability to constantly assess and interpret the history, clinical signs and symptoms of the disorder, along with the skill of administering therapeutic techniques. 


Part 1 of this correspondence course covers the manual therapy and exercise for the treatment of common thoracic conditions such as thoracic outlet syndrome and first rib as well as T4 syndrome.  It includes a detailed case report and eight illustrations describing manual therapy techniques. Also described are the most common running-related injuries including patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes and their biomechanics and prevention. 


Part 2 of this course covers the treatment of postural stabilizing syndromes for the upper, mid and lower thorax and the thoracic nerve root syndrome.  It also includes detailed case studies, four illustrations demonstrating manual techniques and four illustrations of exercises for the treatment of the above mentioned conditions.


3

CEUs

400.00

Rehabilitation of Some Thoracic Syndromes – Part 2

Rehabilitation of Some Thoracic Syndromes – Part 2

Successful management of any thoracic syndrome is contingent upon the therapist’s ability to constantly assess and interpret the history, clinical signs and symptoms of the disorder, along with the skill of administering therapeutic techniques. 

Part 1 of this correspondence course covers the manual therapy and exercise for the treatment of common thoracic conditions such as thoracic outlet syndrome and first rib as well as T4 syndrome.  It includes a detailed case report and eight illustrations describing manual therapy techniques. Also described are the most common running-related injuries including patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes and their biomechanics and prevention.   

Part 2 of this course covers the treatment of postural stabilizing syndromes for the upper, mid and lower thorax and the thoracic nerve root syndrome.  It also includes detailed case studies, four illustrations demonstrating manual techniques and four illustrations of exercises for the treatment of the above-mentioned conditions.


3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Examination of the Cervical Spine:  Part 1

Examination of the Cervical Spine: Part 1

We all know that as the most mobile region of the vertebral column the cervical spine is vulnerable to trauma, as well as to problems of apparently spontaneous onset. Determining the source of the problem is essential before selecting a treatment regime.


Part 1 and 2 of this correspondence course provides a comprehensive guide to the examination of the cervical spine and clinically associated anatomical regions.


The physical examination section is reinforced with 10 photographs that will assist you with the performance of the examination and treatment techniques.

3

CEUs

Examination of the Cervical Spine: Part 2

Examination of the Cervical Spine: Part 2

We all know that as the most mobile region of the vertebral column the cervical spine is vulnerable to trauma, as well as to problems of apparently spontaneous onset. Determining the source of the problem is essential before selecting a treatment regime. 

Part 1 and 2 of this correspondence course provides a comprehensive guide to the examination of the cervical spine and clinically associated anatomical regions. 

The physical examination section is reinforced with 10 photographs that will assist you with the performance of the examination and treatment techniques.

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sharon Rossouw, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

3

CEUs

400.00

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 1

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 1

How do you isolate the syndromes or conditions that could result in diagnoses like Zygapophyseal Joint Arthralgia, Zygapophyseal joint – acute locking, recurrent locking of cervical Zygapophyseal joints, discogenic pain and cervical nerve root pain? How do you select the most appropriate treatment modality?


These on-line courses discuss some essential concepts every physiotherapist needs in his/her arsenal when faced with some of the common cervical conditions for which manipulative therapy and exercises have a major role in over-all management.

3

CEUs

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 2

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 2

How do you isolate the syndromes or conditions that could result in diagnoses like Zygapophyseal Joint Arthralgia, Zygapophyseal joint – acute locking, recurrent locking of cervical Zygapophyseal joints, discogenic pain and cervical nerve root pain? How do you select the most appropriate treatment modality?

 


These on-line courses discuss some essential concepts every physiotherapist needs in his/her arsenal when faced with some of the common cervical conditions for which manipulative therapy and exercises have a major role in over-all management.

3

CEUs

400.00

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 3

Rehabilitation of Cervical Syndromes: Part 3

How do you isolate the syndromes or conditions that could result in diagnoses like Zygapophyseal Joint Arthralgia, Zygapophyseal joint – acute locking, recurrent locking of cervical Zygapophyseal joints, discogenic pain and cervical nerve root pain? How do you select the most appropriate treatment modality?

 

These on-line courses discuss some essential concepts every physiotherapist needs in his/her arsenal when faced with some of the common cervical conditions for which manipulative therapy and exercises have a major role in over-all management.

3

CEUs

400.00

Whiplash associated disorders: implications for management:Part 1

Whiplash associated disorders: implications for management:Part 1

Whiplash. It can happen so easily yet its consequences can be long lasting and debilitating. This course provides an insight into the complex set of mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of chronic WAD.

It also highlights the facts physiotherapists need to take into account when dealing with both the acute and chronic stages of WAD in order to reduce chronicity associated with this condition.

3

CEUs

400.00

Whiplash associated disorders: implications for management: Part 2

Whiplash associated disorders: implications for management: Part 2

Whiplash. It can happen so easily yet its consequences can be long lasting and debilitating. This course provides an insight into the complex set of mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of chronic WAD.

 

It also highlights the facts physiotherapists need to take into account when dealing with both the acute and chronic stages of WAD in order to reduce chronicity associated with this condition.

3

CEUs

400.00

The Cervical Spine and Headache: Part 1

The Cervical Spine and Headache: Part 1

Did you know that Cervicogenic headache probably accounts for between 10 and 20% of benign headaches? Did you know that there is a growing body of evidence that multimodal physical therapy can assist these patients?

Fundamental to the successful management of cervicogenic headache is the differential diagnosis of headache.

3

CEUs

400.00

The Cervical Spine and Headache:  Part 2

The Cervical Spine and Headache: Part 2

Did you know that Cervicogenic headache probably accounts for between 10 and 20% of benign headaches? Did you know that there is a growing body of evidence that multimodal physical therapy can assist these patients?

 

Fundamental to the successful management of cervicogenic headache is the differential diagnosis of headache.

 

Part two of this course describes the physical examination of the headache patient and covers the articular, the muscle systems, the neuro motor control, muscle strength and postural form. It also deals with the management of cervicogenic headache utilising manual therapy, therapeutic exercise and more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Adverse Effects of Cervical Manipulative Therapy

Adverse Effects of Cervical Manipulative Therapy

It’s every physiotherapist’s worst nightmare: something going horribly wrong during examination and treatment of a patient.

 

This course examines the issue of neurovascular complications such as vertebrobasilar arterial dissection following Cervical Manipulative Therapy and evaluates whether or how physiotherapists can avoid or prevent the nightmare.

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ilene Odendaal, Physiotherapist, Brakpan 

Covered the essential biomechanics  and its like a refresher course.  Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni 

Great refresher on biomechanics.  Good value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Rdige

Good value for my practice. Mojalefa Sebetlela, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

Good value for my practice.  Trevor Hutton, Biokineticist, Richards Bay 

 

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet. 

This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

NEW - Differentiating Patellofemoral and Tibiofemoral Pain

NEW - Differentiating Patellofemoral and Tibiofemoral Pain

Testimonials:

Excellent value to my practice.  A Michaeli, March 2020

Good value for my practice.   Bianca Dwyer, Physiotherapist, Steelpoort


Pain experienced in and around the knee is a widespread occurrence. The knee is made up of the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint. Pain experienced in the knee can occur from several different structures as well as causes. Performing a thorough, detailed interview and physical examination can assist you in clinically reasoning the various differential diagnoses and isolating the exact cause of symptoms.


3

CEUs

Hip Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 2 - Predisposing Factors

Hip Pain in the Sports Person: Part 2 - Predisposing Factors

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Elmarie Van Coller, Physiotherapist, Wellington 

Good value for my practice.  Mandy Banks, Biokineticist, Cape Town


Until recently, the hip joint was not thought to be a significant cause of problems in the athletic population. Now, thanks to MRI, and hip arthroscopy we have been able to learn more about some of the common underlying causes of groin pain. These will be covered in part one and two of this course.

Part 3 covers the clinical assessment and treatment of labral tears, ligamentum teres tears, synovitis, chondropathy, surgical management, os acetabulare and lateral hip pain.

This on-line course includes ample photos of exercises for hip rehabilitation.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet.


This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Observation and Bony Palpation

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Observation and Bony Palpation

These 3 issues on-line courses provide a clear, concise manual concerning the
process of physical examination of the knee.


This illustrated guide would direct the clinician in a logical, efficient and
thorough search for relevant anatomy and pathology. To facilitate the
teaching, the 3 issues contains over 100 illustrations.

Part 1: Observation and Bony Palpation

This on-line course illustrates the observation examination
and surface anatomy of the knee and its clinical relevance
to knee pathology.

3

CEUs

400.00

Hip Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 3 - Rehabilitation of the Injured Hip

Hip Pain in the Sports Person: Part 3 - Rehabilitation of the Injured Hip

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Elmarie Van Coller, Physiotherapist, Wellington

 

Until recently, the hip joint was not thought to be a significant cause of problems in the athletic population. Now, thanks to MRI, and hip arthroscopy we have been able to learn more about some of the common underlying causes of groin pain. These will be covered in part one and two of this course.

Part 3 covers the clinical assessment and treatment of labral tears, ligamentum teres tears, synovitis, chondropathy, surgical management, os acetabulare and lateral hip pain.

This on-line course includes ample photos of exercises for hip rehabilitation.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Footwear Selection

Footwear Selection

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, JHB

Good value for my practice.  Refilwe Mhlabane, Podiatrist, Johannesburg


Matching a foot and shoe is a process that requires thought, scientific measurement, and rationale. Though the research on shoe selection is still incomplete, shoe selection based on foot structure and measures of forefoot orientation, arch height and rear foot standing posture can aid in injury prevention.

This course offers information on the types of running shoes, arationale and overall paradigm for shoe fitting using scientific methodology, as well as scientific literature related to orthotics.

3

CEUs

400.00

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Soft Tissue Palpation

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Soft Tissue Palpation

These 3 issues on-line courses provide a clear, concise manual concerning the
process of physical examination of the knee.


This illustrated guide would direct the clinician in a logical, efficient and
thorough search for relevant anatomy and pathology. To facilitate the
teaching, the 3 issues contains over 100 illustrations.

Part 2: Soft Tissue Palpation.

This on-line course will take you step by step over soft tissue palpation of the knee region related to clinical situations.

3

CEUs

400.00

The Sporting Hip - Integrated Approach

The Sporting Hip - Integrated Approach

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Candyce Hall, Biokineticist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Ingrid Sobey, Physiotherapist, Durban


How should you treat elite athletes who present to you with complex pathology (muscle dysfunction, strength and flexibility components and underlying joint dysfunction) and a prolonged history of unsatisfactory previous treatment?

This on-line course provides effective solutions for the rapid resolution of chronic, complex groin and thigh pain involving local myofascial injury with associated joint dysfunction.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Groin Pain:  A View from Below

Groin Pain: A View from Below

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

Thank you so much - was a good refresher course summing up all aspects.  Good value for my practice.  Anni Gerryts, Biokineticist, Pretoria 

Great article - groin pain is often considered as not something a podiatrist would treat. I've had loads of success in treating groins as part of the team attending to the patient.  Excellent value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Ridge


Chronic groin pain is a common problem in athletes. The multifactorial nature and the various anatomical structures that contribute to groin pain have made the condition difficult to prevent and manage. Early detection and intervention are the keys to optimal management and prevention of chronic injury. This course provides the clinician and podiatrist in particular with an understanding of the entity, focuses on the biomechanical risks associated with groin pain from a lower extremity perspective and introduces the role of podiatry as an effective adjunct to the multi-disciplinary groin management team.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Tests for Joint Stability and Efffusion

Illustrative Clinical Knee Examination: Tests for Joint Stability and Efffusion

These 3 issues on-line courses provide a clear, concise manual concerning the
process of physical examination of the knee.


This illustrated guide would direct the clinician in a logical, efficient and
thorough search for relevant anatomy and pathology. To facilitate the
teaching, the 3 issues contains over 100 illustrations.

Part 3: Tests for Joint Stability and Effusion.

This course is an illustrated guide for testing knee joint instability i.e.
ACL, PSL, MCL, LCL. In addition, useful tests for knee effusion will be discussed.

3

CEUs

400.00

Hip

Hip

0.00

Radiological Examination of the Hip - Clinical Indications, Methods, and Interpretation:  A Clinical Commentary

Radiological Examination of the Hip - Clinical Indications, Methods, and Interpretation: A Clinical Commentary

History and physical examination can be useful to classify young active individuals with non-arthritic intra-articular hip pathology as having impingement or instability. However, the specific type of deformity leading to symptoms may not be apparent from this evaluation. Several radiological indexes have been described in the literature for individuals with non-arthritic hip pathology.


This course outlines the clinical indications, methods, and interpretation of hip radiological images as it relates to physical examination findings for those with non-arthritic hip pathology.

3

CEUs

400.00

Hyperkeratosis of the Foot:  Part 1

Hyperkeratosis of the Foot: Part 1

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatirst, Cape Town


Hyperkeratosis is the most common disorder of the adult foot.  In most cases the causes are mechanical in nature and should be managed appropriately.  A minority of cases are caused by a range of other conditions.  Effective treatment for these requires a firm diagnosis.  Where the aetiology is uncertain referral to a specialist should be sought.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Biomechanics of the Patellofemoral Joint

Biomechanics of the Patellofemoral Joint

At last. An easy to understand insight into the applied biomechanics of the patella. Along with discussions of various exercise and treatment modalities make this online course immediately applicable in your clinical practice

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Rectus Femoris and Iliopsoas

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Rectus Femoris and Iliopsoas

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

rectus femoris and iliopsoas

3

CEUs

400.00

Acute Ankle Injuries:  Part 1

Acute Ankle Injuries: Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

Good value for my practice.  Kayla Deysel, Biokineticist, Centurion 

Good value for my practice.  Melinda Snyders, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


What is said to be the most common sport injury?  Which of the many different sports injuries is most likely to recur?  Answer: Ankle injuries. 

Is there anything you can do to reduce the pain, improve the function and prevent recurrence of a sprained ankle – or should you just tell your patient to let the natural recovery process take its course?  This two part course provides valuable answers to these important questions.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 1

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 1

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Johanna van Niekerk, Physiotherpist, Nelspruit

 

Treatment of Patellofemoral pain is changing. In the past, interventions have typically focused on the joint itself. But is that enough? Aren’t there possibly other factors at play –and if so, what approach should be taken to treat it?

This two part on-line course provides:

  • fresh insight into the mechanics that may influence the patellofemoral joint; and
  • provides treatment options that bring long-term success.

3

CEUs

400.00

Muscle Energy Techniques:  Lower Quarter: Hamstrings and TFL

Muscle Energy Techniques: Lower Quarter: Hamstrings and TFL

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

 

This illustrated on-line course covers the assessment, interpretation and treatment of the following short/tight muscles:

  • Hamstrings:
  • Lower and upper hamstrings
  • Tensor fascial lata

3

CEUs

400.00

Acute Ankle Injuries:  Part 2

Acute Ankle Injuries: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

 

What is said to be the most common sport injury?  Which of the many different sports injuries is most likely to recur?  Answer: Ankle injuries.

Is there anything you can do to reduce the pain, improve the function and prevent recurrence of a sprained ankle – or should you just tell your patient to let the natural recovery process take its course?  This two part course provides valuable answers to these important questions.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 2

Etiology of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome - Part 2

Treatment of Patellofemoral pain is changing. In the past, interventions have typically focused on the joint itself. But is that enough? Aren’t there possibly other factors at play –and if so, what approach should be taken to treat it?

This two part on-line course provides:
fresh insight into the mechanics that may influence the patellofemoral joint; and
provides treatment options that bring long-term success.

3

CEUs

400.00

0.00

0.00