Loading

The Shoulder



NEW - Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain and the Athlete: Suggestion for Management

NEW - Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain and the Athlete: Suggestion for Management

Testimonial: 

Good value for my practice.  Hasmita Mithal, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

 

Highly recommended.

This on-line teaching module defines the term rotator cuff related shoulder pain and its possible causes, treatment approach, and risk factors.

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy, according to Lewis "refers to pain and weakness, most commonly experienced with movements of shoulder external rotation and elevation, as a consequence of excessive load on the rotator cuff tissues". The patho-etiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy is multifactorial and can be attributed to extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms, as well as to environmental factors. Rotator cuff tendinopathy is not a homogenous entity because of the diverse nature of the factors involved and hence, different treatment interventions are required, which take these specific mechanisms/factors into account.

3

CEUs

NEW - Shoulder Instability in Athletes: Non-Operative Management

NEW - Shoulder Instability in Athletes: Non-Operative Management

Highly recommended. 


This on-line teaching course focuses on the challenges of non-operative treatment for shoulder instability.

The term ‘shoulder instability’ is used to refer to the inability to maintain the humeral head in the glenoid fossa. The ligamentous and muscle structures around the glenohumeral joint, under non-pathological conditions, create a balanced net joint reaction force. 

If the integrity of any of these structures is disrupted it can lead to atraumatic or traumatic instability. Atraumatic instability commonly results from repetitive overhead movements or congenital joint features. Traumatic mechanisms of injury may result in frank dislocations where there is a loss of joint integrity. Instability can occur anteriorly, posteriorly, or in multiple directions regardless of the mechanism of injury. 


3

CEUs

NEW - Current Concepts in Shoulder Rehabilitation

NEW - Current Concepts in Shoulder Rehabilitation

Highly recommended.

This on-line teaching will discuss the challenges in shoulder rehabilitation:

  1. Exercise is as effective as surgery for subacrial pain syndrome (impingement) and for atraumatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. 
  2. Structural diagnosis is usually not possible and there is a very poor correlation between imaging findings and symptoms.
  3. Symptom modification may be the best way to overcome this impasse.
  4. Exercise is the most important component of the management of shoulder pain but a marginal gain theory should also be considered.

 

3

CEUs

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 1

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person: Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Dr. Sholini Sookraj, Chiropractor, Durban 

A great overview of various categories of shoulder injuries and how to assess a shoulder injury. Useful to my practice.  Good value for my practice.  Daniella Fernandes, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Karin Perner, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Tshepo Bokaba-Rammele, Physiotherapist, Hammanskraal 

Good value for my practice.  Bronwyn van den Berg, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

 

In recent years, there have been many advances in the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain. Part one of these on-line courses reviews:

  • the functional anatomy of the shoulder complex;
  • the key features of the clinical history;
  • how to conduct a swift and effective physical examination;
  • investigations;
  • treatment of important shoulder conditions; and
  • the prescription for practical shoulder rehabilitation.

Part 2 focuses on mechanism of injury, assessment and rehabilitation of the rotator cuff.

3

CEUs

400.00

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person:  Part 2

Shoulder Pain in the Sports Person: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Hugo Johanni, Biokineticist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Daniella Fernandes, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Ilse Senekal, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

 

In recent years, there have been many advances in the assessment and treatment of shoulder pain. Part one of these on-line courses reviews:

  • the functional anatomy of the shoulder complex;
  • the key features of the clinical history;
  • how to conduct a swift and effective physical examination;
  • investigations;
  • treatment of important shoulder conditions; and
  • the prescription for practical shoulder rehabilitation.

Part 2 focuses on mechanism of injury, assessment and rehabilitation of the rotator cuff.

3

CEUs

400.00

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation - Part 1

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation - Part 1

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Kate-lyn Vos, Biokineticist, Meyersdal 

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessica Krone, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Stephan Terblanche, Biokineticist, Durban 

Excellent value for my practice.  Wendy September, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Lara Leech, Biokineticist, Roodepoort

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


These courses are based on the physiology and biomechanics of the shoulder. They provide very effective rehabilitation protocols in terms of return to play. They will assist you to diagnose not only local anatomical lesions, such as rotator cuff tear or Bankart lesion, but also the biomechanical deficits that exist in the shoulder girdle and spine. 

But that’s not all. Distant disorders such as inflexibilities of hip rotation, short hamstrings, or the stiff back also often contribute to shoulder abnormalities. The course will enable you to make a complete diagnosis and to look beyond the injured tissues to tissues that may be overloaded. 

You will also learn to detect functional biomechanical deficits as well as the subclinical adaptations that sports people use to try to maintain performance.

3

CEUs

400.00

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation:  Part 2

Principles for Shoulder Rehabilitation: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Stephan Terblanche, Biokineticist, Durban 

Excellent value for my practice.  Wendy September, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town
 

Good value for my practice.  Megan Goldblatt,  Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Ilse Senekal, Biokineticist, Johannesburg


These courses are based on the physiology and biomechanics of the shoulder. They provide very effective rehabilitation protocols in terms of return to play. They will assist you to diagnose not only local anatomical lesions, such as rotator cuff tear or Bankart lesion, but also the biomechanical deficits that exist in the shoulder girdle and spine.

But that’s not all. Distant disorders such as inflexibilities of hip rotation, short hamstrings, or the stiff back also often contribute to shoulder abnormalities. The course will enable you to make a complete diagnosis and to look beyond the injured tissues to tissues that may be overloaded.

You will also learn to detect functional biomechanical deficits as well as the subclinical adaptations that sports people use to try to maintain performance.

3

CEUs

400.00