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Podiatry



Groin Pain:  A View from Below

Groin Pain: A View from Below

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch

Thank you so much - was a good refresher course summing up all aspects.  Good value for my practice.  Anni Gerryts, Biokineticist, Pretoria 

Great article - groin pain is often considered as not something a podiatrist would treat. I've had loads of success in treating groins as part of the team attending to the patient.  Excellent value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Ridge


Chronic groin pain is a common problem in athletes. The multifactorial nature and the various anatomical structures that contribute to groin pain have made the condition difficult to prevent and manage. Early detection and intervention are the keys to optimal management and prevention of chronic injury. This course provides the clinician and podiatrist in particular with an understanding of the entity, focuses on the biomechanical risks associated with groin pain from a lower extremity perspective and introduces the role of podiatry as an effective adjunct to the multi-disciplinary groin management team.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Hyperkeratosis of the Foot:  Part 1

Hyperkeratosis of the Foot: Part 1

Testimonial:

Excellent value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatirst, Cape Town


Hyperkeratosis is the most common disorder of the adult foot.  In most cases the causes are mechanical in nature and should be managed appropriately.  A minority of cases are caused by a range of other conditions.  Effective treatment for these requires a firm diagnosis.  Where the aetiology is uncertain referral to a specialist should be sought.

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Ilene Odendaal, Physiotherapist, Brakpan 

Covered the essential biomechanics  and its like a refresher course.  Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni 

Great refresher on biomechanics.  Good value for my practice.  Nelfrie Kemp, Podiatrist, Umhlanga Rdige

Good value for my practice. Mojalefa Sebetlela, Physiotherapist, Pretoria

Good value for my practice.  Trevor Hutton, Biokineticist, Richards Bay 

 

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet. 

This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Assessment of Foot Mechanics - Part 2

Excuse the pun but the feet are the foundation for running mechanics. If you are interested in knowing more about running mechanics and how this affects virtually the entire body, you cannot ignore the feet.


This e-Learning course is the foundation for running mechanics and will provide you with a systematic method for clinical gait assessment and so much more.

3

CEUs

400.00

Footwear Selection

Footwear Selection

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Good value for my practice.  Refilwe Mhlabane, Podiatrist, Johannesburg 

Good value for my practice.  Annarie Donald, Biokineticist, Potchefstroom 

Good value for my practice.  Esterina Pretorius, Physiotherapist, Sasolburg


Matching a foot and shoe is a process that requires thought, scientific measurement, and rationale. Though the research on shoe selection is still incomplete, shoe selection based on foot structure and measures of forefoot orientation, arch height and rear foot standing posture can aid in injury prevention.

This course offers information on the types of running shoes, arationale and overall paradigm for shoe fitting using scientific methodology, as well as scientific literature related to orthotics.

3

CEUs

400.00

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Common Overuse Injuries in Running

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Jessie Pillay, Biokineticist, Johannesburg

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Saras Naidoo, Physiotherapist, Cape Town

Excellent value for my practice.  Ine Terblanche, Physiotherapist, Vanderbijlpark

Good value for my practice.  Khumbuza Reagan Cele, Physiotherapist, Stellenbosch 

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Chante du Preez, Physiotherapist, Kempton Park

Excellent value for my practice.  Johann Wessels, Physiotherapist, East London

Good value for my practice.  Lara Brookstein, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg

 

Running is a hugely popular activity – but many runners overdo it, suffer injuries as a result, and then turn to us as clinicians to sort them out – as quickly as possible. 

This course will help you learn about the common risk factors for running overuse and how to prevent them. 

Also described are the most common running-related injuries including patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes and their biomechanics and prevention.

3

CEUs

400.00

To stretch or not to stretch?  Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

To stretch or not to stretch? Injury Prevention and Management among Athletic Populations

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Cassie van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, East Londen 

Good value for my practice.  Lara Leech, Biokineticist, Roodepoort


Static Stretch (SS) does not appear to reduce injury risk and any effect on earlier return to sport is of marginal clinical significance.  In contrast, a graduated strength training programme appears to significantly reduce injury risk and significantly reduce the time to return to sport after injury.

Therefore, the only area in which SS might seem to offer a specific advantage is in the area of increasing flexibility.  However, there remains a lack of evidence that gains are superior to those of a strength training programme. Even if strength training is eventually confirmed as being inferior to SS at increasing flexibility, the fact that strength training improves performance, pain, disability, injury and return to sport rates mean strength training must be a mainstay of athletic development and training, in contrast to SS.

3

CEUs

400.00

Achilles Tendinopathy

Achilles Tendinopathy

Testimonials: 

Excellent value for my practice.  Jacqui Botha, Physiotherapist, Plettenberg Bay

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Linda Birkenstock, Podiatrist, Polokwane 

Good value for my practice.  Madeleine Van der Merwe, Physiotherapist, Cape Town 

Excellent value for my practice.  Frederick Colyn, Physiotherapist, Bloemfontein 

Good value for my practice.  Melinda Snyders, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg 

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

Good value for my practice.  Sherril Hulett, Physiotherapist, Cape Town


This e-Learning course summarises the tendinopathy continuum and articulates the authors' clinical reasoning and hands-on experience managing Achilles tendinopathy. We outline graded loading concepts while emphasising that relying on recipes is likely to fail. We also provide a perspective on the role of central pain processing and peripheral input from nociceptive fibres in the context of tendinopathy. 

Rehabilitation should be tailored to address identified impairments (muscle bulk asymmetries, kinetic chain dysfunction, tolerance of energy storage and release in the Achilles tendon), and progressively work toward movements and activities relevant for the individual's sport or daily activities.

3

CEUs

400.00

Acute Ankle Injuries:  Part 1

Acute Ankle Injuries: Part 1

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

Good value for my practice.  Kayla Deysel, Biokineticist, Centurion 

Good value for my practice.  Melinda Snyders, Physiotherapist, Johannesburg


What is said to be the most common sport injury?  Which of the many different sports injuries is most likely to recur?  Answer: Ankle injuries. 

Is there anything you can do to reduce the pain, improve the function and prevent recurrence of a sprained ankle – or should you just tell your patient to let the natural recovery process take its course?  This two part course provides valuable answers to these important questions.

3

CEUs

400.00

Acute Ankle Injuries:  Part 2

Acute Ankle Injuries: Part 2

Testimonials:

Good value for my practice.  Michelle Utton, Podiatrist, Cape Town 

Good value for my practice.  Hanneke Erasmus, Physiotherapist, Port Elizabeth

 

What is said to be the most common sport injury?  Which of the many different sports injuries is most likely to recur?  Answer: Ankle injuries.

Is there anything you can do to reduce the pain, improve the function and prevent recurrence of a sprained ankle – or should you just tell your patient to let the natural recovery process take its course?  This two part course provides valuable answers to these important questions.

 

3

CEUs

400.00

Sprained Ankle - Integrated Approach

Sprained Ankle - Integrated Approach

Testimonial:

Good value for my practice.  Karen Laubscher, Physiotherapist, KZN

Did you know that ankle injury is arguably the most common sport injury? And did you know that a sprained ankle also has a high frequency of recurrence?

Is there anything you can do to reduce the pain and improve the function of a sprained ankle – or should you just tell your patient to let the natural recovery process take its course?

Two case studies described in this on-line course demonstrate approaches that provide rapid and significant improvement and provoke some interesting food for thought.

3

CEUs

400.00

Principles of Injury Prevention:  Part 3:  Equipment, Running Shoes, Spikes, Boots and Ski.  Tennis Racquets and Appropriate Surfaces

Principles of Injury Prevention: Part 3: Equipment, Running Shoes, Spikes, Boots and Ski. Tennis Racquets and Appropriate Surfaces

Testimonials:

Excellent value for my practice.  Kathryn Pelser, Biokineticist, JHB 

Good value for my practice.  Fortune Howard, Podiatrist, Emalahleni

 

The science of sports injury prevention has grown exponentially over the past two decades. We know that interventions can prevent major knee, ankle and other injuries. This course will help you to help your sports clients to reduce the risk of injury. You will gain a thorough understanding of how sports injuries occur. Then you will gain in-depth knowledge of the factors that can reduce the risk of injury – warm-up, stretching, taping and bracing, equipment, surfaces, training, envelope of function and the central governor model for the limit of performance and their appropriate use.                                                                       

3

CEUs

400.00